Blog

The 3 Misconceptions of Collaboration

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A guiding coalition is formed, teachers are placed in collaborative teams, and the work begins. What could go wrong? Unfortunately, what often plays out is that the renewed enthusiasm is quickly eroded because educators charged with implementing the PLC process succumb to the misconceptions of collaboration. Read more

Celebrating and Curating for Curriculum Alignment

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Curriculum alignment is important. It is essential to ensuring rigorous learning for all and appropriate vertical and horizontal articulation. Curricular alignment requires assessment and instruction to be aligned to standards, including the intended rigor of the standard. It ensures that students have a clear, cohesive experience from year to year and leads to a guaranteed and viable curriculum. While many educators see the value in this work, it isn't necessarily something that many look on as an exciting or worthwhile experience. Read more

How Is Time Spent During Your Team Meetings?

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It was many years ago, and my elementary school was very large, over 2,000 students. There were 12 of us teaching third grade. We thought our survival depended on us working together. We met weekly . . . Read more

PLC Team Efficacy: If We Think We Can, Can We?

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You’ve probably heard the saying, “If you think you can, you can. If you think you can’t, you can’t. You’re always right!” (Not sure who originated that saying, but mothers everywhere seem to have adopted it!)... Read more

Collaboration on a Broader Scale: Partnering With Higher Education to Build Capacity

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One of the three big ideas of a professional learning community is building a collaborative culture. We build collaborative teams and relationships within our organizations to increase our . . . Read more

The Professional Teacher

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I received an interesting response from a teacher to a blog entry I made in support of giving teachers time to collaborate. In that entry (posted January 29, 2007) I attempted to make the point . . . Read more