Crimson View ELementary

  1. PLC Story
  2. PLC Practices
  3. Achievement Data
  4. Awards
  5. Resources

Our success is attributed to teachers and staff more fully engaging in the PLC process. The teachers and staff have worked diligently to improve instruction, increase student knowledge, and to clarify the specific knowledge and skills all students must acquire to advance.  This process includes grade level collaborative teams who determine Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum (GVC) with learning targets for each GVC. Furthermore, teams create common formative assessments, analyze student data, and provide interventions and extensions for each student.

When the school opened in 2013 the administration, faculty, parents, and community came together to focus on what is best for students.  Through much collaboration, we determined a vision for the school and also developed collective commitments.  As a community, we have committed to be responsible for the success and well being of every student.  We have committed to monitor student learning through continuous assessments using data to guide instruction and provide meaningful interventions and extensions.  

As we opened Crimson View Elementary, we were focused on and committed to the PLC process.  Our collaboration has changed from a focus on schedules and routines to a focus centered on students learning at high levels. In addition to grade level teachers participating in collaborative teams, administrators also participate in collaboration time and are able to get feedback from teacher teams on the four PLC questions through a PLC Collaborative Assessment Log. The leadership team is able to follow up on student needs based on conversations during PLC time.

Guided by our District, our teachers work in collaborative teams to determine the GVC for our students. GVCs are written in kid-friendly language and communicated to all stakeholders, including parents.  The GVCs are a focus of our tier one instruction and are also taught in tier two and tier three settings.  We strive to ensure all students meet the standard of each GVC.

Teacher teams meet at a specific time each week to identify students who have and have not achieved high levels of learning and provide interventions to assure each student understands the concept.  If students are above grade level on each learning target, teacher teams provide extension activities to challenge above grade level students.  A specific time is set aside each day for interventions and extensions. Teacher aides provide additional tier two instruction for those students who do not meet GVC standards.  Leveled Literacy Instruction by Fountas and Pinnell is one program we use for tier 2 instruction.

Students have become part of the PLC process by keeping track of their own data and conducting their own parent-teacher conferences.  Students track their learning by graphing scores, reflecting, and setting goals. They share this information with parents and set goals for improvements.

In conclusion, at Crimson View Elementary we have committed to follow the PLC process by improving tier one instruction, increasing student knowledge, and clarifying the specific knowledge and skills all students must acquire to be successful.  We consider every student's needs and strengths as we work together as a school community to ensure success.  Our vision is for all students to be confident leaders of tomorrow.  The PLC process is essential to developing students who will be those leaders.

 

1. Monitoring student learning on a timely basis.

Teachers and support staff understand the importance of data analysis in the learning process.  Teachers begin each year by collecting data on each student. These sources may include district and school benchmark assessments in Language Arts and Math. Depending on skill level, teachers progress monitor students weekly, biweekly, or monthly on reading using DIBELSNext.  Students are assessed weekly and monthly in Math. Furthermore, grade level teams create Common Formative Assessments to monitor student learning. Teachers use these assessments to monitoring progress toward meeting each GVC (Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum) goal. GVC's and common assessments are created for Language Arts, Math, and Science.   Teachers also use this data to improve individual and collective instruction.

Additionally, students are involved in the monitoring and tracking of their own learning. Students are provided with goals based on their performance and grade level expectations. Critical to this process is that students are told their goal. Students are then involved with charting their progress and seeing their growth based on aim-lines.  Parents are informed of their students' progress quarterly at parent-teacher conferences, weekly on SeeSaw (classroom facebook type media), and through teacher phone calls and emails.

 

2. Creating systems of intervention to provide students with additional time and support for learning.

The Master Schedule is created each year to include intervention and extension times.  Every Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday grade level students are divided up into skill groups using a common formative assessment.  Teachers are able to reteach, practice, or extend content for students based on their individual needs.

Students at Crimson View Elementary can receive multiple opportunities during the day to receive support based on their individual literacy or math skill levels. Students’ first opportunity in the day is quality classroom instruction in both whole group and small group reading and math. During whole group reading, students are taught vocabulary and concepts presented by the district’s reading materials (MHE Wonders).  In math (MHE My Math), students receive background information of skills and vocabulary they need to understand math concepts.

Students' second opportunity is grade level small group time. This is scheduled each day for Language Arts. Teachers are able to group students according to ability.  Teachers meet with each group from 15-30 minutes each day practicing reading skills. We have two reading intervention teachers and two reading aides who push in small groups for extra practice for struggling students. These teachers use LLI (Leveled Literacy Intervention by Fountas and Pinnell).  Students qualifying for Special Education will receive extra help in reading during small group time.  These students will also have small group instruction with their teacher. The KEEP (Kindergarten Entry and Exit Profile) assessent provides teacers with information about basic skills in reading and math. Additional district-made items (along with KEEP results) assist teachers in making decision about Optional Extended Kindergarten for students. Results are used by teachers (school-level) and reported to district and State. We have one session of OEK for struggling Kindergarten Students.

Any teacher who has a student that is not making adequate academic or behavioral progress takes the concern to the Intervention Support Team (IST). This team consists of a variety of student support staff that meets on a weekly basis to analyze data, determine instructional approaches, or needs for specific academic or behavioral interventions. Student concerns are also shared with the Principal and Instructional Coach during weekly grade level PLC meetings. Additional instructional or behavioral strategies may be implemented and tracked prior to meeting with the TAT team.

Grade level teams meet with the principal and learning coach quarterly to review benchmark data and determine next steps for students who are not progressing adequately.  We have developed a large magnetic board.  Each student has a magnet with their name on it. They are placed on the board acoording to their benchmark assessments in LA and Math. We meet and discuss struggling students, move magnets as goals have been met, and determine next steps for each student.

For example,  we had a new third grade student enter our school at the beginning of this school year. We will call him KC.  KC began the year reading 62 words per minute with 95% accuracy.  He was a little below grade level.  His teacher is a new teacher this year.  She met with her grade level team, discussed strategies and skills she could incorporate into her whole group and small group instruction, and worked with KC in small groups.  She also progress monitored him bi-weekly.  He is now reading 99 words per minute with 99% accuracy. He is on grade level for the end of the year.

3. Building teacher capacity to work as members of high performing collaborative teams that focus efforts on improved learning for all students.

Building high performing, collaborative teams who focus on improving students learning takes time and dedication.  Our teachers meet before school every Tuesday morning to collaborate and review student data.  We meet every other Friday morning before school to build teacher capacity.  These trainings may include engagement strategies, differentiated instruction, integrating content, small group instructional strategies, STEM concepts and instruction, technology integration, and much more.

We have early out Monday afternoons once a month.  These days are dedicated to improving whole group instruction.  We have partnered with several universities in the area including Dixie State University and Brigham Young University.  We have worked with different professors who have helped train our teachers.  Teachers have participated in video coaching.  Teachers video themselves teaching and self reflect or work with the school's learning coach to improve instruction.

For example, we received a grant from the STEM Action Center through the state of Utah.  We hired a professor from BYU, Dr. Steven Shumway.  He came down and spent 6 days with our teachers.  We worked on STEM integration and student engagement.  

 

Additional Achievement Data

 

Location

ELA

Math

Science

Year

Crimson View Elementary

3rd

4th

5th 

78

 

68

84

78

80

 

66

87

86

84

 

 

88

79

2017

 

2017

2017

2017

District

49

49

56

2017

State

 

45

47

45

2017

Crimson View Elementary

3rd

4th 

5th 

73

 

70

80

68

72

 

66

85

62

75

 

 

82

65

2016

 

2016

2016

2016

District

49

49

57

2016

State

 

44

47

49

2016

Crimson View Elementary

3rd

4th

5th

70

 

64

69

81

70

 

56

75

83

70

 

 

68

73

 

 

2015

 

2015

2015

2015

District

50

49

56

2015

State

 

44

45

47

2015

Crimson View   

66

 

 

67

65

2014

District

 

46

41

51

2014

State

 

42

39

44

2014

 

Crimson View Elementary applied for and received a Platinum STEM designation from the state of Utah.  This is the highest designation possible.

Crimson View Elementary is ranked 4th in the state based on state assessment data for the 2016-17 school year.

 

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