Lewis and Clark Elementary

  1. PLC Story
  2. PLC Practices
  3. Achievement Data
  4. Awards
  5. Resources

Lewis and Clark Elementary began its PLC journey in the summer of 2007. At that time, Kyle Palmer began as principal at Lewis and Clark, and was joined by 5 members of their already established leadership team for two years of training with the Missouri Professional Learning Community project. At the end of 2 years, the training ended. Lewis and Clark took it upon themselves to continue professional development through book studies, article sharing, and numerous meetings.

Lewis and Clark worked collaboratively to write a mission, vision, values and goals that meant more than just the paper they were written on. Collective commitments were established to better define the adult actions to carry out the mission and vision of the school.

Common planning time had already been created by designing a master schedule that allowed every team to meet for 50 minutes per day. Students go through 4 specials classes on a 4-day cycle, so each day teams have 50 minutes of common planning time. Collaborative teams have a minimum requirement to meet at least twice a week. However, most grade levels meet at least 4-5 times per week to collaboratively focus on the “right work” of teams to better increase student learning. Norms were created in 2010 for each grade-level team to define how they would collaborate with each other over the course of the year. Norms are also in place for Professional Development large-group meetings.

To ensure high levels of learning, Lewis and Clark has worked hard the past several years to align their work to the 3 key ideas of a PLC. Collaborative teams focus their time and energy on the right work of developing norms, unwrapping curriculum, identifying essential outcomes, writing and analyzing common formative assessments to monitor learning and guide instruction, setting SMART goals, responding to struggling learners by carving out time each day for individual and small group instruction, enrich and extend learning, and build a culture of celebration.

In the past two years, Lewis and Clark has leveraged their strong PLC foundation to transform their traditional school to be more future-ready and able to meet the needs of their 21st century learners. Maker spaces, Project Lead the Way, PBL, and flexible learning environments are just a few of the changes they have made in their transformation.

1. Monitoring student learning on a timely basis.

Student learning at Lewis and Clark is monitored throughout the year by using a variety of formative and summative assessments.

Collaborative grade-level teams identify and agree upon essential outcomes for their students and use pacing guides and common formative assessments to identify Tier II and Tier III students and identify exact learning needs of students. Data team processes are used to analyze CFA results consistently and identify instructional moves that will meet each student’s specific learning need. SMART goals are established based on the CFA data and learning is monitored using dipstick assessments throughout the unit. Monthly meetings with administration are used to unwrap curriculum, write and analyze CFAs, and align intervention to support struggling learners.

Lewis and Clark began to use learning goals in the fall of 2010 to better implement a guaranteed and viable curriculum in math and science. The district adopted the principles of Marzano’s Standards-based Grading and Reporting to help guide instruction in the classroom. Through this process, teachers began to understand how to better write assessment tasks by using Marzano’s taxonomy. Teachers also began to track student learning by tracking assessments according to the learning goals and reporting topics used for various subjects. In the fall of 2011, Lewis and Clark piloted a new standards-based report card. In alignment with the learning goals, Lewis & Clark teachers also began to utilize data notebooks to monitor and record student growth over time. Multiple graphs and documents were used to allow the students to take ownership for their own learning and to not make learning such a mystery to the students. Data notebooks were used by the students to explain to their parents how they are doing with learning various learning goals on a weekly and monthly basis, as well as during student-led conferences. Specific teacher feedback was an important component to help students understand their learning.  

2. Creating systems of intervention to provide students with additional time and support for learning.

Lewis and Clark aligned their response to intervention plan closely to the beliefs and philosophies of a PLC. To begin planning for this implementation, a RTI vertical team was established in the spring of 2010 to begin plans and expectations for the school. The team researched best-practice interventions and brainstormed thoughts on scheduling to include RTI time. The team also created a sense of urgency for the staff on the importance of making sure ALL students are learning, and learning at high levels. Professional development was provided for the staff and expectations were presented to the staff during the summer of 2010. In 2011, the RTI team did a book study on Simplifying Response to Intervention: Four Essential Guiding Principles (Buffum, Mattos, & Weber, 2012).

Grade-level collaborative teams work with administration to design a master calendar that will allow each team to build in 25-30 minutes of “Blazer” time (RTI) each day. It is necessary to stagger intervention blocks throughout the school day so that no team shares a similar time. This allows more flexibility to utilize school resources and personnel.

Lewis and Clark’s RTI plan is research-based, timely, directive, targeted, systematic and built on the following principles:

  1. Collective Responsibility
  2. Concentrated Instruction
  3. Convergent Assessment
  4. Certain Access

Tier I- Restore the Core (unwrap curriculum, build CFAs to monitor learning and consistently assess, diminish gaps in curriculum by using effective instructional strategies.)

Tier II- After unwrapping the curriculum, common formative assessments are written and utilized to monitor student learning. Collaborative teams use the data team process to identify students in need of intervention for their learning needs based on collaboratively scoring the CFAs. Teams then have conversations to discuss why each student is not learning and what instructional strategies would be effective to meet their learning needs. Collaborative teams organize students into flexible RTI groups to provide extra support for the students in need of intervention. Teachers match their strengths with the learning needs of the students to ensure learning for all. It is important for our school to give our student the collective best of us all, not just one teacher in isolation. Through this process, research-based interventions are provided to students in a timely, directive, targeted and systematic way to ensure high levels of learning for all students. Other school staff members such as counselor, speech therapist, special education teachers, intervention para and other paras are utilized to support students in need of intervention. Interventions are provided on a daily basis during each team’s RTI block. Interventions are provided in reading, writing, and math.

Tier III- Lewis & Clark uses universal screeners in the areas of reading, writing, number sense, English language learner, attendance, and behavior to identify students in need of intervention before they fail. The school analyzes the Key Performance Indicators (KPI) to universally screen all students and identify students in need of Tier III supports.

       

 

Universal Screening

Diagnostic

Progress Monitoring

Kindergarten

I-Ready, DRA

Lexia, SIPPS

I-Ready, Lexia

1st  Grade

I-Ready, DRA

Lexia, SIPPS

I-Ready, Lexia

2nd Grade

I-Ready, DRA

Lexia, SIPPS

I-Ready, Lexia

3rd Grade

Performance Series, I-Ready

Lexia

I-Ready, Lexia

4th Grade

Performance Series, I-Ready

Lexia

I-Ready, Lexia

5th Grade

Performance Series, I-Ready

 

Lexia

I-Ready, Lexia

 

English language learners (ELL) are screened using a district assessment during enrollment. PowerSchool (district student management system) is used to track attendance and monitor attendance for all students. BIST (Building Intervention Support Team) referrals and plans are used to screen and provide interventions for students in need of positive reinforcement with their behavior. Students identified through these screeners are identified as Tier III students and are provided with every resource possible at our school. Tier III students will be provided daily intervention time for 30 minutes with a classroom teacher, in addition to more time with the building intervention para and others trained paras as needed. Staff personnel such as speech pathologist, counselor, psychologist, BIST consultant, special education teacher, social worker, and district behavior interventionist are utilized to help support struggling students. Staff works with Tier III students individually.

Collaborative teams meet weekly to monitor the effectiveness of their RTI and continually move students based on skill and need. Analyzing data is an essential piece to the RTI process. Administrators m eet with collaborative teacher teams and other personnel such as special education teachers and paras, counselors, speech pathologists, social workers and intervention para at least every 4 weeks to monitor student learning for all students.

Enrichment is also a focus durin g this RTI time as students are flexibly grouped to wo rk on higher - level thinking skills, more challenging text , and more rigorous math problem - sol ving. Students are grouped with other st udents to challenge each other ’s ’ thinking. During each team’s data team process, teachers plan how to best meet the needs of these high achieving students who need to be challenged in the classroom. Trained paraprofessionals are again used to help provide interventions and enrichment instruction to students. Through this process, learning needs are being met fo r al l students as each student is receiving instruction during RTI time.

Lewis & Clark utilizes three separate and distinct teams to implement their RTI model. The collaborative team is in charge of all Tier I and II instruction; the school intervention t eam is in charge of diagnostic assessment, interventions and progress monitori ng of all Tier III students. Finally, the school vertical team is in charge of the overall vision and work of the school’s RTI plan.

Through their Pyramid of Intervention, Lewis and Clark implements numerous other intervention programs to support their struggling learners, such as: Support One Student” (SOS ), YouthFriends, In - School study hall, District Behaviorist, A+ and EIP tutors, WatchDogs, Assist, BIST consultant, triage, principal and counselor calls home, older student mentor program, Backpack snacks and principal check - in.

3. Building teacher capacity to work as members of high performing collaborative teams that focus efforts on improved learning for all students.

A leadership team was created as PLCs were initially implemented. In 2009, a member of the classified staff joined the team. Vertical teams were established in 2008. Vertical teams are still in place in 2013, although they have transformed a bit. The reading and writing vertical teams have been combined to form the English Language Arts (ELA) vertical team. The math and science vertical teams combined to form a single team, a Response to Intervention (RTI) and Culture team were added to better align the work of the school to PLC beliefs. In 2013, a Behavior Support and Technology vertical team were also added. The ELA team is working on implementation of our communication arts curriculum to new ELA CCSS curriculum as well as assessment opportunities and plan for this school year. The math and Science team works hard to help our school understand and implement our standards-based grading and reporting system. This team led staff through professional development in tracking learning goals, assessment, and implementation of the new standards-based report card. Starting next year, the math and science team will lead our school in implementing the Math CCSS for the 2014-15 school year. The RTI team continues to support our school’s RTI plan to ensure high levels of learning for our students. The Culture team focuses on facilitating a culture of celebration for our school and how to align our actions to our mission, vision and core values. The technology team is leading our implementation of teachers and students having i-pads in the classroom and how to transform our teaching and learning to utilize the use of technology. Finally, the behavior supports team is leading our RTI behavior system by tracking and support student expectations and behavior.

Lewis and Clark’s special education team has worked hard to align their work to our PLC. Norms have been established along with increasing their understanding of grade-level essential outcomes. The special education team meets 3 times a week to plan how their team can collaborative meet the needs of all special education students. An exciting thing that Lewis and Clark began in the fall of 2011 was the organization and use of a RED binder. The RED binder provides a resource for teachers that includes materials such as survey tools, articles, data team protocols, consensus guidelines, school mission, vision and core values. The RED binder also includes a place for teams to list their team norms as well as a listing of our school-wide group norms. Finally, included in the RED binder is a list of collaborative team expectations outlined by the school principal. The document outlines all expectations of collaborative teams on ways they can ensure they are focusing on the “right work.” This was a way to increase the focus of the time they spent in collaborative team meetings. Once a month, the principal has the sole purpose for team meetings of monitoring the work of the team, once a quarter the team and principal collaborate on a Team CFA on how the team is performing.

2013-2015 MSIP 5 Annual Performance Report (The Missouri School Improvement Plan (MSIP) is the annual performance report that measures every school building in the state of Missouri for the accreditation process. As an elementary building, we are allotted 70 possible points based on academic achievement, subgroup achievement, and student attendance.

Academic Achievement

48

48

100

 

Subgroup Achievement

12

12

100

 

Attendance

10

10

100

95.3% above 90%

2013 TOTAL

70

70

100%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Academic Achievement

48

48

100

 

Subgroup Achievement

12

11

91.7

 

Attendance

10

10

100

96.3% above 90%

2014 TOTAL

70

69

98.6%

 

Academic Achievement

48

48

100

 

Subgroup Achievement

12

10

83.3

 

Attendance

10

10

100

95.1% above 90%

2015 TOTAL

70

68

97.1%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The graphs below show cohort trend data for Lewis and Clark Elementary as we feel this is the best way to measure student growth and achievement. The numbers represent our score, the district average, and then the state average. As evidenced by tracking each cohort (by color), Lewis and Clark consistently grew faster then the state and district averages. Often times, remarkable improvement was achieved. It is important to note the *3rd Grade CA test changed in 2011 and 2012 and the MAP test format changed dramatically from 2014 to 2015.

 

LC/ District/ State Communication Arts

 

 

 

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

3rd

56.1/ 56.5/ 40.8

64.2/ 65.8/ 41

63.9/ 56.4/ 43.9

 *46/52.7/44.5

*50/ 54.7/ 46.1

 61.5/60.9/48.5

56.9/55.8/42.3

69/74.1 /57.2

4th

63.1/64.1/45.6 

65.1/68/ 47

71/ 65.7/51.7

82.3/ 66.9/ 52.7

69.3/ 65.5/ 52.9

71.5/64.6/53.5

76.5/59.6/46.3

89.1/73.2/58.5

5th

 59.6/63/48.7

65.1/63.7/47.8

70.5/ 69.7/ 51.8

72.1/ 68.1/ 52

78.7/ 66.7/ 52.6

60.5/65.2/53

61.6/60.9/50.7

78.8/74.2/59

 

Cohort Growth Trends

 

 

 

       + 14.4%

        + 7.9%

         + 14.8%         

 

       +14.5%

 

   +11.6                                

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

3rd

69.7/ 65.1/ 44.3

75.9/ 65.8/ 45

81.4/ 63.3/ 47.8

 70.1/ 68.6/ 50.2

76.9/ 70.4/ 52.5 

#87.5/68.2/51.4

71.6/66.5/50.7

71.0/64.3/52

4th

 63.2/66.9/44.7

68.8/69.7/ 44.9

64.5/67.1/49.1

85.4/ 65.7/ 51.2

77.3/ 71.1/ 51.1 

##86.8/68.5/50.8

85.9/61.2/42.9

84.0/63.9/49.6

5th

 54.2/65.4/46.3

65.1/69.3/47.8 

76.1/ 74.1/52.4

76.6/ 71.9/ 54.2

88.3/ 73.7/ 55

76.7/69.5/54.5

71.5/69.0/52.8

59.0/56/39.9

                   

 

 

 

 

 

 

               

 

 

LC/ District/ State Science

 

 

 

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

5th

61.5/ 60.7/ 44.7

70.1/ 61.5/ 45.2

67/ 66.7/ 49.3

 75.5/ 66.9/ 50.8

80.8/ 73.7/ 51.6

68.6/64/51.9

60.5/62.6/48

65.5/59.3/47

 

 

 

  • 2015 International Center for Leadership in Education (ICLE) Model School (1 of 5 in the country)
  • 2014 MAESP (Clay-Platte) Missouri Assistant Principal of the Year- Mrs. Katie Lawson
  • 2013 Missouri Association of Elementary School Principal’s (Clay-Platte region) Missouri Principal of the Year award- Dr. Kyle Palmer
  • 2013 Liberty Public Schools District Teacher of the Year- Ms. Michaela Baker
  • 2010 Liberty Public Schools District Teacher of the Year- Ms. Michele Kernell
  • Perfect MSIP Score- 2013- 70/70 (19% of elementary schools in the state received this 70/70 distinction)
  • Missouri Top Ten Performance multiple years (2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2008)
  • Top 5 in Northland Kansas City area (CA & Math) 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015

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