Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

  1. PLC Story
  2. PLC Practices
  3. Achievement Data
  4. Awards
  5. Resources

         Edgewood Jr/Sr High School is a school of choice that services high-performing students. Edgewood transitioned from a middle school to a junior/senior high school of choice in 2004.  Since this change, Edgewood has gained a unique school culture. The teachers, administrators, parents, students, and community have come together to create this culture over the past few years. The largest step in making this change was that of implementing the professional learning community. The Edgewood School Improvement Plan (SIP) began to take on a new look. PLTs began taking form and addressing the needs of the students/school. By using Rick DuFour’s guiding questions—1. What do we expect students to learn? 2. How will we know when they have learned these skills? 3. What will we do if they do not learn these skills? 4. What will we do when students do learn these skills? (DuFour, 2010)—teachers had a foundation in their PLTs. The professional learning community (PLC) has brought the school together through a common vision of teaching and learning for which teachers are mutually accountable. Collaboration amongst members has increased cohesiveness in strategy implementation, assessment, and continuous improvement. Common assessments and teacher collaboration have provided students with a more consistent educational experience, and provided an environment where students are more likely to succeed and show mastery of state-mandated standards (DuFour, 2013). During this practice, teachers become aware of inconsistencies in pace, practice, and assessment. Teachers share best teaching strategies and practices with each other and catalogue successful lessons for reference. The data reveal the many achievements Edgewood Jr/ Sr High School has made through this transition.

     Each of our PLTs meet as a whole by department to discuss vertical and horizontal alignment and how we can keep topics and procedures consistent from grade level to grade level. In addition, each subgroup meets to work on common assessments and plan with each other. English breaks up by grade level and other subjects meet by course (ex: Algebra, Geometry). This has been key to our success because as they meet in smaller groups they can discuss the expectations of their course but also where students came from and where they are going. 

      An example of how our PLTs have been operating is with our English department. The data from the 10th-grade FSA reading and writing tests show that Edgewood has been able to sustain high achievement with the introduction of the PLC. The 10th-grade team is consistently working together to create common reading assessments for their grade-level texts. They utilize data sheets with their students to gain feedback and involve the students in progress monitoring. They collaborate often to ensure that all 10th-grade students are working on the same skills at the same time. They also make sure the students are all reading the same texts at the same time. A common writing rubric was generated by the team to use with the students as well. It is important to note that many changes have occurred with the FSA writing test over the years. The rubric changed to put extra emphasis on the mechanics of writing. Grammar became an integral part of the rubric. Even with these changes in expectations, the PLT has been able to stay abreast with research-based teaching strategies to reach the students and keep them high performing. The 10th grade teachers were able to share this with the 9th grade teachers at a PLT meeting and now those teachers are able to utilize the rubric so that students are familiar with it. Since the state began testing writing in the 9th grade as well, this made for a smooth transition for both teachers and students. At the present time, all English teachers are following the above steps because they have been so successful. Other PLTs have followed these same procedures utilizing common assessments and pace. This is giving our students a cohesive education throughout their career here at Edgewood.

1. Monitoring student learning on a timely basis.

      The Edgewood Jr./Sr. High School professional learning community evaluates student needs based upon prior summative assessments including FSA, EOC, ACT, AP, midterm, and final exams. Multiple formative assessments are used at Edgewood as well. Teachers do this in various ways including the use of whiteboards or technology such as clickers or programs like kahoot, quizizz, google surveys in addition to class discussions, etc.

          Teachers collaborate in professional learning teams and school-wide as a professional learning community to effectively monitor student learning by addressing the overall efficiency of the teaching methods utilized and performed on a daily basis in order to address the specific proficiency standards that students must achieve. This collaboration ensures a consistent monitoring system of the student learning in the classroom.  Administration periodically reviews the evaluation process used by the PLTs and contributes to the monitoring of student learning alongside the teachers.  Teachers use this valuable resource to their benefit by allowing the evaluation of student performance to impact their teaching strategies that are used in the classroom. 

          In addition, teachers monitor student learning through the use of document cameras and a computer program called GradeCam. Every teacher at Edgewood has a document camera in his/her classroom. This technological resource allows teachers to complete an item analysis quickly and easily. They can easily see if a specific question was missed by many students. This information helps teachers make instructional decisions as well as inform students through data analysis. The teachers take advantage of this data by collaborating in their PLTs to address the students’ needs. They can also share strategies if one teacher's students scored well on a question when another teacher's students did not. There is also a program called Performance Matters in which teachers can look at their students and filter based on different characteristics. They are quickly able to identify the students in the lowest 25%. They can also sort their students to look for their weakest areas and provide extra support to these students. 

           Edgewood parents, students, and teachers collaborate collectively by using Edline, the district’s adopted online grade book, which is updated weekly by teachers and provides grades, attendance records, and classroom policies and assignments.  With Edline, parents and students no longer have to wait for interim reports or report cards to see how they are performing in classes. They may check Edline anytime they wish.  The utilization of this beneficial tool has provided an ultimate communication link between teachers, students, and parents that provides an up-to-date system of student performance.  This allows a consistent monitoring system for student learning. Guidance and administration work closely with teachers as well. Students' receiving a D or F for a quarter are met with individually by a counselor or administrator.

         The teams in a model PLC constantly monitor student learning through team-developed common formative assessments so they can intervene for students who struggle. The PLCs use the results to inform and improve their practice.  Edgewood teachers take assessments beyond the summative level.  Utilizing bell work, exit slips, student surveys, technology resources and benchmark testing, teachers utilize the feedback they get from their students to develop their summative assessments. Teachers have also developed plans to allow students to correct or redo assignments in an effort to master the standards for their courses.  After these strategies are incorporated into the lessons, then the summative assessment follows.  The developmental assessments are shared among PLC members and observed when teachers conduct classroom visits with each other.  Each teacher is observed at least twice by their peers and at least once by an administrator.  Teachers then receive feedback on their performance.  The focus is often on formative assessment strategies, on the use of common assessments, and on the use of assessment data. 

2. Creating systems of intervention to provide students with additional time and support for learning.

         Pre-planning week begins with faculty meetings to share data that has been disaggregated by the administration and guidance personnel throughout the summer months. This helps to raise teachers’ awareness of the strengths and weaknesses so they can begin their year preparing to increase student achievement based on this data.

          Edgewood has numerous interventions in place to assist students that require additional time to complete assignments, extra support for learning, and for students that would like to spend more time in the learning environment. Programs are available before school, during Indian Time (see below), after school hours, and during the summer months. The interventions in place not only provide assistance for those in need, they create an atmosphere with an emphasis on learning during all aspects of the school day.

          Our newest addition for the 2017-2018 school year is a program called Indian Time. Students are given approximately one hour four days a week to eat lunch and work on academics. Students use this time to seek help from their teachers or peers. They also work collaboratively on projects or homework. Another option for students during this time is to make up missing work or tests.  In addion, this time serves as enrichment where students can spend extra time on activities of their choosing and attend college presentations or listen to guest speakers. In the spring, we will implement SAT help sessions. Students will link their Khan Academy account to their College Board account to find their weaknesses. They will have an English and Math teacher available to help hone in on their areas of weakness. This program was put in place to help students increase their score on the SAT so they will be considered college and career ready.

          Indian Time allows students to receive specific assistance in an environment where the teacher can provide individual attention with no classroom interference. All teachers provide an hour a week in which they are available to assist students. This benefits students that may be apprehensive about asking questions in front of the class. The school’s National Honor Society and Junior Honor Society students also organize tutoring sessions before and after school in addition to Indian Time. With the implementation of Indian Time, students who require further assistance, but may not have been able to receive help due to transportation issues now have many opportunities to receive one-on-one attention.

          In addition to students receiving support during Indian Time, teachers have extra time for support each week as well. Teachers have an additional 90 minutes each week to collaborate with peers. During this extra time, they are able to generate solutions for struggling students and provide the support more quickly than they were previously able to with meetings only once per month. Teachers also have this extra time to analyze the data of their formative assessments, giving students help with weaknesses in a timely manner. 

          Guidance counselors and administration are also part the PLCs in which we identify students who need extra assistance. Teachers can check in with guidance and administration weekly and let them know if students are attending the teachers' Indian Time office hours for help. If a student is not showing up, guidance or administration is then able to talk with the student and help them realize the benefit of attending help sessions. This provides a cohesive message to the students that everyone at the school cares about their success.                

             On the day that we do not have Indian Time, students attend a Tribe class. These classes are broken down by grade level and alphabet. For the six years the students are enrolled at Edgewood, the students will more than likely have the same Tribe teacher. This teacher becomes a mentor/tutor to these students.  Each teacher comes in contact with their assigned students to monitor their progress in the school.  This could mean academic, attendance, social/emotional or service learning progress.  Teachers of the same grade level Tribe meet once per month. When they convene, they work together to utilize strategies to assist struggling students.  They then go back to their Tribes and aid students in need of assistance.  They do this in a nonthreatening atmosphere, and they utilize the resources available to them. Students build a relationship with these teachers and the students in their class to become a family as they journey through Edgewood together. Our gifted students are grouped in Tribe together and therefore are able to receive their gifted services without missing academic time.

        To improve writing abilities, Edgewood has a program in place called “The Writing Center.” The Writing Center consists of peer tutors overseen by an English Language Arts teacher and is open to all grades.  They have sessions during Indian Time to offer feedback to students on their writing. Students bring a piece of writing to The Writing Center and a peer will help to edit their work. It has helped strengthen all students as those who need assistance are able to receive it and those students who are peer editing are practicing a skill that they will need for life.

            To eliminate some of the pressure on incoming 7th graders, Edgewood has developed a “Math Camp.” This summer math-specific program provides an opportunity for new 7th graders to become familiar with the school, their new classmates, and their new math teachers. Math Camp incorporates many math activities and games into the lessons which make math fun. Once Math Camp is completed, the students that participated feel less stress on the first day of school.

            Finally, PLT members at Edgewood have made a tremendous paradigm shift by allowing students to “re-do” or “re-take” assignments to demonstrate mastery of a concept.  Edgewood has seen students achieve higher levels of understanding and success by being allowed to rework problems, projects, and assignments, during the school day, to master the standards of the courses they are taking.  Edgewood teachers have realized that students sometimes progress at different paces, and allowing students to “try again” has proven to be monumental in the development of their academic progress and proficiency.  The teachers collectively have to agree on these strategies to be consistent, fair, and most importantly effective.   In closing, the PLTs at Edgewood look at data (student progress), collaborate, strategize, and implement best teaching practices to address all students during the school day.

3. Building teacher capacity to work as members of high performing collaborative teams that focus efforts on improved learning for all students.

           Building teacher capacity at Edgewood Jr/Sr High School has been at the forefront of the school for the past five years.  Every month the faculty meets to discuss the issues that are facing the school and to get updates on curriculum and share teaching strategies to best support each other.  Three years ago Edgewood Jr/Sr High School started to meet once a month as a MESH group.  Math, English, Science, and History departments meet every month before school to share different teaching strategies, a lesson they used in their classes and/or examples of student work. Teachers went through the process of what worked well and what needed to be improved in each of their lessons or assessments. Teachers also discuss ways to differentiate instruction, create common summative assessments, and share innovative technologies. The focus of these MESH PLTs is to improve learning for all students.

             The district is moving toward a culture of peer coaching where each teacher is a coach to another.  The teachers are all students, teachers, coaches, and learners.  The role of the peer coach is to be the catalyst as the school begins to shape a culture where this is a foundational belief.  The goal is to have all teachers observing one another and learning from the sharing of craft and reaping benefits from the development of collegial, collaborative relationships. Peer coaches observe teachers and conference with them before and after classroom observations.  The post-observation conference between teacher and coach is collegial and collaborative and is encouraging and reflective. 

            The district employs resource teachers for every subject area.  Those teachers work with the schools to provide resources and curriculum support.  They keep their departments up-to-date on state statutes that may be mandated and involve the curriculum.  They provide training on new textbooks, technology in the classroom, and strategies.  The resource teachers hold department chair meetings twice a year so that all the schools in Brevard County can collaborate and share strategies, lessons, events, and other resources implemented in their schools. They also host a curricular symposium for new teachers to a specific subject area. This is held at the beginning of the year to give teachers all the information they need to start their year off successfully. 

          Schools in Brevard County release early every Wednesday.  One of those early release dates are earmarked for professional development. Some of the seminars conducted at Edgewood Jr/Sr High are on technology, relationship building, looking at data and how to best help students with disabilities be successful in their classrooms. The district is also implementing more training on students social and emotional well being. 

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

Standardized Assessments Comparison Data- 3 years

 

Assessment

EJSHS

2015

EJSHS
2016

EJSHS

2017

District

2015

District

2016

District

2017

State

2015

State

2016

State

2017

FSA ELA Gr. 7

93

95

97

58

56

59

51

49

52

FSA ELA Gr. 8

96

98

98

61

63

62

55

57

55

FSA ELA Gr. 9

97

97

93

62

58

61

53

51

52

FSA ELA Gr. 10

96

96

96

60

58

58

57

50

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FSA Math Gr. 7

94

97

99

61

63

61

52

52

53

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science Gr. 8

93

95

97

55

55

56

48

48

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EOC Civics

97

99

99

73

74

76

65

67

70

EOC Biology

99

99

97

73

71

70

65

64

64

EOC US History

98

98

98

70

68

68

66

66

67

EOC Algebra 1

96

98

96

63

62

65

56

55

62

EOC Algebra 2

82

88

86

47

50

49

36

40

42

EOC Geometry

98

95

94

63

58

58

53

51

54

 

* Numbers represent percent of students scoring at or above proficient 

 

AP Assessment Data- 3 year comparison- Overall (not subject specific)

 

Total tested

Total number 3 and above

Total percent 3 and above

2015

999

680

68

2016

1105

741

67

2017

1207

860

71.2

 

 

 

 

ACT Assessment Data- 3 year comparison

 

 

Grad Year

English

EJSHS

English

State

Math

EJSHS

Math

State

Reading

EJSHS

Reading

State

Science

EJSHS

Science

State

 

Composite

EJSHS

Composite

State

2015

26.2

18.9

25.3

19.6

26.8

21.0

25.1

19.5

26.0

19.9

2016

25.7

18.9

25.7

19.5

26.4

21.1

26.1

19.5

26.1

19.9

2017

26.0

19.0

25.8

19.4

26.2

21.0

25.8

19.4

26.1

19.8

 

ACT- College Level Coursework Readiness

College Course

Edgewood Jr/Sr High

State of Florida

College English Composition

96%

52%

College Algebra

83%

32%

College Social Studies

76%

43%

College Biology

76%

29%

Meeting all 4

65%

21%

 

* This chart was prepared based on benchmark scores that would correlate to a C or higher in a credit-bearing college course. This is prepared by ACT in collaboration with postsecondary institutions. 

* See attached documents for better formating.

  • Designated a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence in 2008 & 2017
  • Grade "A" School designation from the Florida Department of Education for the last 14 years
  • Ranked 50th in the nation and 7th in Florida by US News and World report earning a gold medal in 2017
  • Ranked 32nd in the United States as a most challenging high school by the Washington Post
  • Awarded Florida Arts Model School status for 2016-2019 in the area of Music
  • Earned the Digital Classrooms Program grant which awarded us 280 laptop computers for student use in 2016
  • Florida Power Library School 
  • National Model PLC School 2014- present
  • National Certified Senior Project Exemplary High School 
  • 100% graduation rate
  • Cumulative Scholarship earnings for the Class of 2017- $7,324,390

Top