Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

  1. PLC Story
  2. PLC Practices
  3. Achievement Data
  4. Awards
  5. Resources

          Edgewood is a school of choice that services high-performing students. Edgewood transitioned from a middle school to a junior/senior high school of choice in 2004.  Since this change, Edgewood has gained a unique school culture. The teachers, administrators, parents, students, and community have come together to create this culture over the past few years. The largest step in making this change was that of implementing the professional learning community. The Edgewood School Improvement Plan (SIP) began to take on a new look. PLTs began taking form and addressing the needs of the students/school. By using Rick DuFour’s guiding questions—1. What do we expect students to learn? 2. How will we know when they have learned these skills? 3. What will we do if they do not learn these skills? 4. What will we do when students do learn these skills? (DuFour, 2010)—teachers had a foundation in their PLTs. The professional learning community (PLC) has brought the school together through a common vision of teaching and learning for which teachers are mutually accountable. Collaboration amongst members has increased cohesiveness in strategy implementation, assessment, and continuous improvement. Common assessments and teacher collaboration have provided students with a more consistent educational experience, and provided an environment where students are more likely to succeed and show mastery of state-mandated standards (DuFour, 2013). During this practice, teachers become aware of inconsistencies in pace, practice, and assessment. Teachers share BEST teaching strategies with each other and catalogue successful lessons for reference. The data reveal the many achievements Edgewood Jr/ Sr High School has made through this transition.

            The Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT) has always been a primary data tool for the school. Students in grades 7 through 10 take the FCAT reading test. Students in grade 8 take the FCAT science test. Students in grades 7 and 8 take the FCAT math test. Students in grades 8 and 10 take the FCAT writing test. With the more recent introduction of the End-of-Course Assessments (EOCs), less 8th-grade students at Edgewood take the FCAT math and science tests. Almost every 8th-grade student at Edgewood is enrolled in Algebra I. They do not have to take the FCAT math test if they are taking the Algebra I EOC. Additionally, many 8th-grade students are enrolled in Biology I. These students do not take the FCAT science because they take the Biology EOC.

            The data from the 10th-grade FCAT reading and writing tests show that Edgewood has been able to sustain high achievement with the introduction of the PLC. The 10th-grade team is consistently working together to create common reading assessments for their grade-level texts. They utilize data sheets with their students to gain feedback and involve the students in progress monitoring. They collaborate often to ensure that all 10th-grade students are working on the same skills at the same time. They also make sure the students are all reading the same texts at the same time. A common writing rubric was generated by the team to use with the students as well. It is important to note that many changes occurred with the FCAT writing test. In 2012, a 3 on this test was considered proficient/passing. In 2013, this requirement was increased to a 3.5. In addition, the rubric for the test also changed. The rubric changed to put extra emphasis on the mechanics of writing. Grammar became an integral part of the rubric. Even with these changes in expectations, the PLT has been able to stay abreast with research-based teaching strategies to reach the students and keep them high performing.

            The 9th-grade FCAT reading data again show that Edgewood has been able to sustain high achievement. Additionally, this group has improved by 2 percentage points over the past three years. This team has also been creating common reading assessments and aligning texts to be taught at the same time. They use data sheets with their students to track progress and involve the students in their learning. They collaborate with the other grade-level teams as well to align what they are teaching, and they also use a common writing rubric to address the changes in the writing test. These strategies have clearly helped to keep Edgewood students performing above the state norms.

            The 8th-grade FCAT data show the high performance of Edgewood students once again. It is important to note, once again, that many changes occurred with the FCAT writing test at this grade level. These changes were in effect for both 10th grade and 8th grade.  In 2012, a 3 on this test was considered proficient/passing. In 2013, this requirement was increased to a 3.5. In addition, the rubric for the test also changed. The rubric put extra emphasis on the mechanics of writing and grammar. The 8th-grade PLT addressed these changes by creating a common writing rubric. In addition, they collaborate to monitor student progress through common formative and summative assessments and data sheets.

          The 8th-grade FCAT science data show a slight improvement from 2012 to 2013. This PLT creates and gives baseline and benchmark tests to identify standards that need to be addressed. They also constructed a schedule to revisit the 6th-grade standards in correlation to the 7th- and 8th-grade standards. The team meets often to analyze the data from their common assessments and to share best teaching practices.

          The 8th-grade FCAT math data show sustainment of achievement and drastic improvement to a 100% passage rate in 2013. It should be noted, however, that only 1 student took the 8th-grade FCAT math test in 2013. This is because the majority of Edgewood students take Algebra I during 8th grade. These students take the Algebra I EOC in lieu of the 8th-grade FCAT math. The 1 student who did take the 8th-grade math test had taken Algebra I during 7th grade, and therefore, had to take the 8th-grade FCAT math test. During previous years, students taking Algebra I as 8th graders had to take both the Algebra I EOC and the 8th-grade FCAT math test.

            The data from the 7th-grade FCAT reading and math tests show improvement and sustainment of high achievement. The 7th-grade English/language arts PLT collaborate to teach specific standards at the same time. They share strategies and analyze assessment data through common formative and summative assessments. They also use data sheets with the students to monitor progress and inform decision making. This PLT uses data from the FAIR assessments as well to monitor student progress. Students are involved with analyzing the data. They are responsible for monitoring their own progress on their data sheets. The teachers meet with these students often to discuss their strengths and the areas they need to improve upon. The teachers then meet in their PLT to discuss the progress of their students and share best practices.

            Data from the 7th-grade FCAT math test reveal an impressive sustainment of achievement. To accomplish this feat, the PLT for this group incorporated a standards-based practice using problems similar to those on the FCAT 2.0 assessment. They meet often to share and analyze data from common formative and summative assessments that they create together. They use the data to determine classroom strategies to incorporate in their classes. They continue to monitor the students’ progress through an item analysis of the various assessments they are given. The students are involved in the data analysis. They get immediate feedback from the teachers, and they are encouraged to make assessment corrections.

            All of the English/language arts PLTs use FAIR testing as a means for monitoring student progress. The FAIR test is a predictor of how well a student will perform on the standardized FCAT reading. All students, grades 7 through 10, take the FAIR test 3 times per school year. The teachers disaggregate the data and discuss the results in their PLTs. They also involve the students in their own data analysis with reports generated from the FAIR test. The information gained from this assessment is used to determine student needs, and it guides teachers in instructional decision making. Data analysis is an essential component of any effective PLC. According to the peer-reviewed article “Using Self-Assessment to Chart Students’ Paths” by Margaret Heritage, involving students in their assessment data teaches them how to learn (2009, p. 27). Once students master this skill, they can become accountable for their own learning in all subjects and aspects of life. Heritage believes that “what is missing in contemporary assessment practices is any involvement of students in evaluating their own learning and making decisions about how they can improve” (2009, p. 27). This research solidifies the PLTs' decision to include FAIR data analysis with students. It is essential for students to be accountable for their own learning.

            The End-of-Course Assessments (EOCs) are still fairly new to the state of Florida. Officially only 2 years of Algebra I data exist. In 2011, the Algebra I EOC was administered, but not for credit. Edgewood used the data from this “field test” to develop a PLT dedicated to preparing students for the Algebra I EOC. The PLT reviewed the data from 2012 to prepare for the 2013 assessment. Not only did Edgewood remain high performing, but the school scores increased two percentage points. This was made possible through the PLTs collaboration. They worked hard to prepare students through item analysis. They analyzed the “field test” data to determine the teaching strategies they used with the students.

            The Geometry data reveal ultimate effectiveness by the PLT, as 100% of the students passed the Geometry EOC. This PLT focused on incorporating sample EOC questions into their lessons. Specifically, they use pearsonsuccess.net to practice EOC problems. They make it a goal to check for understanding as often as possible with their students. The students all keep notebooks where they store review problems and any assessment corrections they have made. The PLT also incorporated the use of clickers in the classroom to provide students with immediate feedback. Their goal was to involve the students as much as possible in their learning. The notebooks are a main component of this process, as the students have their data in hand at all times.    

            The Biology data also reveal effectiveness, as 99% of Edgewood students passed the Biology I EOC. This PLT focused on using common assessments, data analysis, and item analysis to address the needs of their students. They used data from the Biology I EOC “field test” to determine their approach in preparing students.  They continuously meet to plan and setup labs for the students. They come together to create both formative and summative common assessments. They then analyze the assessments for standard comprehension. The individual teachers share how they taught each standard, and they analyze the success rate of each teacher in teaching the specific standards. Those that were more successful share their strategies with the less successful teachers, and they re-teach the standards. This process is repeated until mastery of all students is evident. Clearly this collaborative technique is working as shown in the success of the students.

            One of the main goals of Edgewood is to use data to make decisions in its professional learning community. Every 10th-grade student at Edgewood takes the PLAN test (pre-ACT), and every 11th-grade student takes the ACT. The PLAN data is used to determine the lowest 25% of student performers in math, English, reading, and science. Teachers then target these students through PLTs. As shown in the ACT data, this collaborative method is working. Edgewood has sustained high achievement on the ACT, regardless of the number of students tested. Not only did Edgewood students perform higher than other students in the state, but they also performed higher than students globally.

           Edgewood maintains an open enrollment for all AP courses. The school offers the students a variety of AP classes to take—25 total. In 2012, Edgewood began offering the AP World History class to all 9th-grade students. The data show the large increase in enrollment with this change. Even with the addition of first time AP student testers (9th-grade students), Edgewood remained high performing. With 45% of Edgewood Jr/Sr High School students enrolled in AP courses in 2013, the school still maintained a high student pass rate of 64%, transcending the global pass rate. Even the first year of implementing the AP World course for 9th-grade students was successful, as Edgewood had an overall passage rate of 61%—again above the global rate.  In addition, Edgewood has drastically increased the number of AP scholars. To accomplish such large feats, the AP teachers worked in PLTs to address the needs of the students. Changes were occurring in many of the AP courses curriculum and exams.  Enrollment was increased drastically, and the school had many first-time AP students. The PLTs met to analyze data, collaborate on best practices, and to develop formative assessments. They focus on item analysis in order to determine their student needs and monitor student progress. They also share significant AP data with the entire school in order to better prepare students across the curriculum.

        The AP English teachers created a PLT to target their AP students' success—specifically with writing. They collaborated together focusing on analytical and argumentative writing techniques. They created common assessments, formative assessments, and analyzed data together. They shared the writing rubric with other disciplines so that student writing needs were addressed across the curriculum. Edgewood improved after implementing the professional learning community, and has since sustained high achievement.

          Throughout the increased number of standardized tests and the modifications to the various tests, Edgewood has sustained high achievement through the implementation of the professional learning community. PLTs are formed to analyze data, create common assessments, and continuously collaborate to target student needs. The results are clearly shown in the data. Edgewood services students by working as a professional learning community.

          Each school year the administration and teachers analyze student achievement levels school wide. As a part of the school improvement plan, the learning needs of all students struggling academically at Edgewood are addressed. During the 2011–2012 school year, the administration identified the lowest 25% of the 7–12 grade students based on two criteria to ensure every grade level was targeted. The two criteria were FCAT reading levels and grade point averages. Some students were on the list for both low FCAT scores as well as a low grade point average. Due to the fact that the entire population of students at Edgewood are considered on grade level or above, the school felt that many teachers may not be aware that students in their classes had low FCAT scores or poor GPAs. It was believed to be important to identify these students and devise intervention strategies to improve the academic achievement not only the lowest 25% of students, but all students at Edgewood. The goal in mind was to bring up the FCAT scores and grade point averages of every student at Edgewood, with a more urgent emphasis on the lowest 25%.

         Each staff member was given a list of students who fell in this category of lowest 25% based on FCAT reading scores, GPA, or both. The assistant principal of curriculum held monthly meetings with each PLC for all core subject areas. In these meeting the teachers were learning how to implement MESH strategies to improve reading comprehension skills with specific attention to vocabulary, reading application, literary analysis, and informational text and research.  

         The implementation of the MESH teaching strategies and teacher’s collaborative efforts through PLC meetings proved to be very successful. Of this lowest 25% group identified, 83% showed an increase in grade point average, and 68% of these students made learning gains on the reading FCAT 2.0.

         In the 2012–2013 school year, Edgewood identified the lowest 25% of students based on FCAT 2.0 reading scores alone. This student list was distributed to all of the professional learning teams. After the students were identified as the lowest 25% the school realized that all of these students did not necessarily need to be monitored, but challenged to make learning gains. The lowest 25% contains level 3 and level 4 students. The teachers continued to meet twice a month in their professional learning teams to implement MESH strategies in the classroom and efforts across the board were made to increase the amount of informational text that the students were exposed to in nonfictional reading. The teachers in all core subject areas focused on these reading comprehension strategies all year to meet the challenges of rapidly changing common core state standards and the complex criteria of the reading FCAT 2.0.  Additionally, Edgewood identified students who need intervention on the basis of the bottom quarter of students on standardized test scores.  Identifying these students is an ongoing process. PLCs often identify individual students and address strategies to intervene and assist them.  Edgewood also has a small PLC group of 4 in the “guidance” area that monitor student progress and identify student needs.  This group will share data and anecdotal information with other PLCs to develop strategies and provide resources to assist the lower performing students.

         Again the collaborative efforts of the school paid off. Seventy-five percent of the students identified as the lowest 25% in the 2012–2013 school year had learning gains. There appears to be direct correlation between the increased collaboration among the PLTs at Edgewood and the learning gains made by the students in the past two school years.  In accordance with the school improvement plan, Edgewood continues to utilize the PLC model. The professional learning community is a research-based practice in which members of the school have a common vision of teaching and learning for which teachers are mutually accountable. Collaboration amongst members increases cohesiveness in strategy implementation, assessment, and continuous improvement. Common assessments and teacher collaboration will provide students with a more consistent educational experience, and provide an environment where students are more likely to succeed and show mastery of state-mandated standards (DuFour, 2010).

         The fundamental structure of PLCs is having a collaborative team of teachers who take collective responsibility for student success in a particular course or grade level.  Teachers at Edgewood Jr/Sr High School are organized into teams by course or grade level. The teachers at Edgewood do meet in organized teams.  Collectively, the PLC groups that are departmentalized meet monthly to share data, teaching strategies, and resources.  Each PLC group will then break down into subgroups based on subject area or course.  These “mini” groups utilize benchmark testing, common assessments, and assessment data.  Again, the opportunity to compare data and student progress allows teachers to collaborate and devise teaching strategies to address student needs in relation to the course curriculum.  The larger department PLC groups meet each month with the smaller PLC groups meeting the following week.  In essence each group, at a minimum, is scheduled to meet once a month.  The smaller groups will meet more often as the courses' curriculum and assessments are aligned. An example:  After a unit is completed and assessed in Biology, all three Biology teachers meet to collaborate and compare the performance of their individual students.  This also happens with other subject areas such as Civics; Algebra I; Language Arts I, II, III; and World History.  Edgewood has made a concerted effort the last two years to get teachers into smaller teams to collaborate, share data, devise teaching strategies, and measure academic achievement.  The end results have been a shared effort by more than one professional to achieve higher academic performance.  Edgewood has seen its test scores increase overall these past two years, and the school’s success is attributed to this collaborative effort given by the PLC groups.

1. Monitoring student learning on a timely basis.

          The Edgewood Jr./Sr. High School professional learning community evaluates student needs based upon prior summative assessments including FCAT, EOC, ACT, AP, midterm, and final exams. Multiple formative assessments are used at Edgewood such as the FAIR test which is administered to students 3 times per year.  The teachers use this data to monitor their students’ progress and make instructional decisions. They have data chats with the students using the various reporting categories from the FAIR assessment that are directly aligned with the FCAT reporting categories. The students then review the data with their teachers, and they set personal goals for the next FAIR assessment and ultimately for the FCAT test in the spring. A constant monitoring system is implemented, and the lowest 25% of the student population, by class, are identified by FCAT scores and classroom grades. 

          Teachers collaborate in professional learning teams and school-wide as a professional learning community to effectively monitor student learning by addressing the overall efficiency of the teaching methods utilized and performed on a daily basis in order to address the specific proficiency standards that students must achieve. This collaboration ensures a consistent monitoring system of the student learning in the classroom on a monthly basis.  Administration periodically reviews the evaluation process used by the PLTs and contributes to the monitoring of student learning alongside the teachers.  Teachers use this valuable resource to their benefit by allowing the evaluation of student performance to impact their teaching strategies that are used in the classroom. 

          In addition, teachers monitor student learning through the use of document cameras and a computer program called GradeCam. Every teacher at Edgewood has a document camera in his/her classroom. This technological resource allows teachers to complete an item analysis quickly and easily. They can easily see if a specific question was missed by many students. This information helps teachers make instructional decisions as well as inform students through data analysis. The teachers take advantage of this data by collaborating in their PLTs to address the students’ needs.

          Edgewood teachers also use clickers to monitor student learning and provide timely feedback to the students. The clickers are signed out to teachers as they request them. Students are able to simply press a button to submit an answer to the teacher, and the teacher may view each answer immediately. All student answers are confidential when displayed on the overhead; however, the teacher is able to see what each student answered. This method is beneficial to both the students and the teachers as a progress monitoring tool. The Edgewood PLTs share the information they gain through clickers, and they collaborate on teaching strategies to implement based on the results.

         Research shows that a professional learning community has the potential to enhance the professional culture within a school district in four key areas; it can:

• build the productive relationships that are required to collaborate, partner, reflect, and act to carry out a school-improvement program;

• engage educators at all levels in collective, consistent, and context-specific learning;

• address inequities in teaching and learning opportunities by supporting teachers who work with students requiring the most assistance; and

• promote efforts to improve results in terms of school and system culture, teacher practice, and student learning (Professional Learning Communities).

         Edgewood parents, students, and teachers collaborate collectively by using Edline, the district’s adopted online grade book, which is updated weekly by teachers and provides grades, attendance records, and classroom policies and assignments.  With Edline, parents and students no longer have to wait for interim reports or report cards to see how they are performing in classes. They may check Edline anytime they wish.  The utilization of this beneficial tool has provided an ultimate communication link between teachers, students, and parents that provides an up-to-date system of student performance.  Edline reports are compiled every 4.5 weeks (interims and report cards), and this allows a consistent monitoring system for student learning. 

         The teams in a model PLC constantly monitor student learning through team-developed common formative assessments so they can intervene for students who struggle. The PLCs use the results to inform and improve their practice.  Edgewood teachers take assessments beyond the summative level.  Utilizing bell work, exit slips, student surveys, and benchmark testing, teachers utilize the feedback they get from their students to develop their summative assessments. Teachers have also developed plans to allow students to correct or redo assignments in an effort to master the standards for their courses.  After these strategies are incorporated into the lessons, then the summative assessment follows.  The developmental assessments are shared among PLC members and observed when teachers conduct classroom visits with each other.  Each teacher is observed at least twice by their peers and once by an administrator each term.  Teachers then receive feedback on their performance.  The focus is often on formative assessment strategies, on the use of common assessments, and on the use of assessment data.

2. Creating systems of intervention to provide students with additional time and support for learning.

          Pre-planning week begins with faculty meetings to share data that has been disaggregated by the administration and guidance personnel throughout the summer months. It is during these meetings that the lowest 25% of our students are identified and shared with the faculty. Once the at-risk students are identified, each PLT reviews the data, collaboratively identifies specific learning benchmarks, shares strategies, and begins to design specific interventions to make improvements in the identified students.

          Edgewood has numerous interventions in place to assist students that require additional time to complete assignments, extra support for learning, and for students that would like to spend more time in the learning environment. Programs are available before school, during the lunch periods, after school hours, and during the summer months. The interventions in place not only provide assistance for those in need, they create an atmosphere with an emphasis on learning during all aspects of the school day.

          One successful program is the Teacher Tutoring Program. This program allows students to receive specific assistance in an environment where the teacher can provide individual attention with no classroom interference. All teachers provide an hour a week in which they are available to assist students beyond the regular school day. This benefits children that may be apprehensive about asking questions in front of the class. The school’s National Honor Society and Junior Honor Society students also organize tutoring sessions before and after school. Between the two tutoring programs, students who require further assistance have many opportunities to receive one-on-one attention.

          One of the most successful interventions introduced by Edgewood is that of the “No-Zero Center.” This intervention ensures students complete all of their assignments and ultimately learn the material. Instead of receiving a zero on a homework assignment, students are assigned “no-zero” slips from their teachers. When a student is assigned a no-zero, he/she must report to the No-Zero Center during the lunch period. The student must complete any missed work during this time. Students in the No-Zero Center take their lunch with them, and they eat while they work on the missed assignment. This intervention reduces the amount of failures due to missing homework while ensuring that students are getting the practice they need on various concepts. Since implementing this intervention, Edgewood students have improved their overall academic performance.

          To improve writing scores, Edgewood has a program in place called “Writers’ Circle.” Writers’ Circle is Edgewood’s creative writing club that is open to all grades.  They meet each Friday after school for one hour.  During this time, students share with the group pieces of creative writing they have been working on.  The group offers feedback and support to each writer. The participants in Writers’ Circle are incredibly supportive of one another.  This has encouraged students to try writing in new genres and about difficult topics. The language arts PLT also has created an intervention known as “Grammar Central.” Grammar Central is essentially grammar tutoring. It is offered Tuesday mornings and Thursday afternoons. Students come to tutoring prepared to focus on a specific issue with grammar. Tutors provide students with attendance tickets showing what was covered during the tutoring session. Students can turn in their ticket to their English teacher and receive extra credit. This tutoring is available all year.

            To eliminate some of the pressure on incoming 7th graders, Edgewood has developed a “Math Camp.” This summer math-specific program provides an opportunity for new 7th graders to become familiar with the school, their new classmates, and their new math teachers. Math Camp incorporates many math activities and games into the lessons which make math fun. Once Math Camp is completed, the students that participated feel less stress on the first day of school.

            Intervention in a PLC is systematic, directive, diagnostic, and timely. Edgewood does not provide busing to its students. Transportation is a student/parent responsibility.  However, the school does address students who are struggling academically and socially by identifying students through our PLCs.  Since Edgewood has a high-performing student population, the issues blocking student performance are often something other than cognitive ability.  Teachers, guidance counselors, and administrators identify students who need added assistance. The student names are gathered and submitted to the school’s curriculum assistant principal.  The list of names is broken down into smaller groups and shared with PLC members.  The teachers then work collectively and collaboratively to devise intervention strategies to assist struggling students.  PLC members also make themselves available to tutor students before or after classes begin each day.  Teachers are required to have a scheduled afternoon session each week to tutor students in their disciplines.  Two teachers on staff also coordinate a National Honor Society peer-tutoring program for students in need of extra help.  At the end of each school year, the “at-risk” student data is collected to monitor academic and behavioral performance.

            Assistance is also provided to students during the school day.  Two points: First, teachers are assigned students to them when the students enter the school.  This is part of the school’s TRIBE Program.  For the six years the students are enrolled at Edgewood, each teacher becomes mentor/tutor to these students.  Daily, each teacher comes in contact with their assigned students to monitor their progress in the school.  This could mean academic progress, attendance progress, or service learning progress.   When teachers convene, they work together to utilize strategies to assist struggling students.  They then go back to their TRIBES and aid students in need of assistance.  They do this in a nonthreatening atmosphere, and they utilize the resources available to them.   Secondly, students who have been identified as “low-achieving” (based on state standardized test scores) are pulled from elective classes during the school day to receive extra instruction from various teachers on staff.  This is done one of two ways.  The students work with a teacher on a one-to-one basis or in small groups during a teacher planning period, or the student(s) is allowed to sit in on a class a second time during the day.  Edgewood does this primarily with its math students.  If a student does not grasp a concept during his assigned class early in the day, the student is placed in the same class later in the day.  The school has seen tremendous success with this intervention strategy, and the students seem to like it as well.  Finally, PLC members at Edgewood have made a tremendous paradigm shift by allowing students to “re-do” or “re-take” assignments to demonstrate mastery of a concept.  As many educators are aware, math instructors sometimes have the most difficulty with this way of thinking.  Often the concrete, sequential way of thinking is hard to overcome, but Edgewood school has seen students achieve higher levels of understanding and success by them being allowed to rework problems, projects, and assignments… during the school day… to master the standards of the courses they are taking.  Edgewood teachers have realized that students sometimes progress at different paces, and allowing students to “try again” has proven to be monumental in the development of their academic progress and proficiency.  The teachers collectively have to agree on these strategies to be consistent, fair, and most importantly effective.   In closing, the PLCs at Edgewood look at data (student progress), collaborate, strategize, and implement BEST teaching practices to address all students during the school day.

3. Building teacher capacity to work as members of high performing collaborative teams that focus efforts on improved learning for all students.

         Building teacher capacity at Edgewood Jr./Sr. High school has been at the forefront of the school for the past three years.  Every month the faculty meets to discuss the issues that are facing the school and to get updates on Common Core and share teaching strategies to support differentiated instruction.  Two years ago Edgewood Jr./Sr. High School started to meet once a month as a MESH group.  Math, English, science, and history departments met every month before school to share different teaching strategies.  The next month they came back to the meeting and shared a lesson they used in their classes and brought examples of student work to share as well. Teachers went through the process of what went well and what needed improving upon in each of their lessons. The focus of MESH is to improve learning for all students; therefore, Edgewood’s collaborative teams continue to work as members of MESH.

          Teachers meet monthly as a department to collaborate on teaching strategies.  Teachers discuss ways to differentiate instruction, create common summative assessments, and share innovative technologies.

          The district is moving toward a culture of peer coaching where each teacher is a coach to another.  The teachers are all students, teachers, coaches, and learners.  The role of the peer coach is to be instrumental, to be the catalysts, as the school begins to shape a culture where this is a foundational belief.  The goal is to have all teachers observing one another and learning from the sharing of craft and reaping benefits from the development of collegial, collaborative relationships. Currently Edgewood is in the second year of peer coaching and have 3 coaches on staff who observe teachers and conference with them before and after classroom observations.  The post-observation conference between teacher and coach is collegial and collaborative and is encouraging and reflective. 

          Brevard Public schools created six training modules, Brevard’s Effective Strategies for Teaching (BEST). The objective of BEST is to align the teaching strategies in the district and to create a common language between departments and teachers.  Edgewood had 3 teacher leaders who took on the role of being BEST trainers and were responsible for training the school’s staff.  The district also employs resource teachers for every subject area.  Those teachers work with the schools to provide resources and curriculum support.  They keep their departments up-to-date on state statutes that may be mandated and involve the curriculum.  They provide training on new textbooks, technology in the classroom, and strategies.  The resource teachers hold department chair meetings twice a year so that all the schools in Brevard County can collaborate and share strategies, lessons, events, and other resources implemented in their schools. 

          This year, schools in Brevard County release early twice per month.  One of those early release dates are earmarked for professional development. Edgewood Jr./Sr. High conducted seminars on technology, Common Core training, and the new evaluation system instituted in Brevard County, Florida. The new appraisal system in Brevard County stresses the importance of teacher collaboration.  To achieve a “highly effective” evaluation, teachers must set professional “stretch” goals.  Stretch goals are strategies that teachers are introducing in their classrooms.  They should be a new practice that they are attempting. To be successful, teachers should research their strategies and collaborate with other teachers to improve their new practice.   The new appraisal system creates a culture and incentive for PLC support.

 

Standardized Assessments Comparison Data -- 2 Years

 
 
 
 
 
 

Assessment

EJSHS 2015

EJSHS 2016

District 2015

District 2016

State 2015

State 2016

 

FSA ELA Gr. 7

93

95

58

56

51

49

 

FSA ELA Gr. 8

96

98

61

63

55

57

 

FSA ELA Gr. 9

97

97

62

58

53

51

 

FSA ELA Gr. 10

96

96

60

58

57

50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FSA Math Gr. 7

94

97

61

63

52

52

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Science Gr. 8

93

95

55

55

48

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EOC Civics

97

99

73

74

65

67

 

EOC Biology

99

99

73

71

65

64

 

EOC US History

98

98

70

68

66

66

 

EOC Algebra 1

96

98

63

62

56

55

 

EOC Algebra 2

82

88

47

50

36

40

 

EOC Geometry

98

95

63

58

53

51

 

 

 

 

 

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

 

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

 

Scale: % at or above proficient compared to state

 

Source: Florida Comprehensive Assessment (FCAT)

 

FCAT

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

Grade: 10th

Reading

Writing

2014

98%

98%

2013

97% / 54%

98% / 85%

2012

99% / 50%

99% / 60%

2011

98% / 52%

NA

 

 

 

FCAT

EJSHS/State

Grade: 9th

Reading

2014

96%

2013

96% / 53%

2012

94% / 52%

2011

92% / 51%

 

 

 

FCAT

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

Grade: 8th

Math

Reading

Writing

Science

2014

N/A

96%

N/A

94%

2013

100 %/ 51%

92% / 56%

88% / 79%

89% / 47%

2012

94% / 56%

96% / 55%

94% / 52%

88% / 47%

2011

96% / 56%

89% / 53%

NA

NA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FCAT

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

 

 

 

Grade: 7th

Math

Reading

2014

100%

94%

2013

98% / 55%

97% / 57%

2012

99% / 56%

97% / 58%

2011

98% / 56%

95% / 58%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

 

Scale: % at or above proficient compared to state

 

Source: End of Course Assessment (EOC)

 

EOC

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EOCs

Algebra I

Geometry

Biology

2014

99%

98%

99%

2013

99% / 64%

100% / 64%

99% / 67%

2012

97% / 58%

NA

NA

2011

NA

NA

NA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

 

Scale: Edgewood ACT mean scores compared to state

 

Source: ACT (American College Testing)

 

ACT

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

 

ACT

Math

Reading

English

Science

Composite

# of Students Tested

2016

25.7/19.5

26.4/21.1

25.7/18.9

26.1/19.5

26.1/19.5

139

2015

25.3/19.6

26.8/21

26.2/18.9

25.1/19.5

26/19.9

126

2014

26.2/19.5

27.4/20.7

26.7/18.7

25.5/19.1

26.6/19.6

141

2013

25.7 / 19.7

26.3 / 20.4

25.3 / 18.7

25.3 / 19.1

25.8 / 19.6

127

2012

25.6 / 20.0

26.7 / 20.5

25.6 / 18.9

24.8 / 19.3

25.8 / 19.8

138

2011

25.9 / 19.9

25.9 / 20.2

25.3 / 18.8

25.4 / 19.1

25.7 / 19.6

109

               

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

 

Scale: % at or above proficient compared to global

 

Source: Advanced Placement (AP) Exam Scores

 

AP

EJSHS/Global

 

 

 

 

Student Pass Rate

# of EJSHS Students  Enrolled in AP Coursework

% of EJSHS Students Enrolled in AP Coursework

# of AP Exams Administered to Students

Year 2016

67%/54.1%

464

81%

1105

Year 2015

74.2%/54.6%

429

75.5%

999

Year 2014

72.5%/53.1%

404

70.1%

845

Year 2013

64% / 51%

408

45%

785

Year 2012

61% / 50.9%

436

47%

800

Year 2011

75% / 59%

249

27%

507

Year 2010

71% / 61%

232

25%

400

Year 2009

70% / 60%

273

30%

Not Available

Year 2008

58% / 60%

180

20%

Not Available

 

 

 

Scale: % at or above proficient compared to state

Source: Florida Comprehensive Assessment (FCAT)

FCAT

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

Grade: 10th

Reading

Writing

2013

97% / 54%

98% / 85%

2012

99% / 50%

99% / 60%

2011

98% / 52%

NA

 

FCAT

EJSHS/State

Grade: 9th

Reading

2013

96% / 53%

2012

94% / 52%

2011

92% / 51%

 

FCAT

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

Grade: 8th

Math

Reading

Writing

Science

2013

100 %/ 51%

92% / 56%

88% / 79%

89% / 47%

2012

94% / 56%

96% / 55%

94% / 52%

88% / 47%

2011

96% / 56%

89% / 53%

NA

NA

 

FCAT

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

Grade: 7th

Math

Reading

2013

98% / 55%

97% / 57%

2012

99% / 56%

97% / 58%

2011

98% / 56%

95% / 58%

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

Scale: % at or above proficient compared to state

Source: End of Course Assessment (EOC)

EOC

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EOCs

Algebra I

Geometry

Biology

2013

99% / 64%

100% / 64%

99% / 67%

2012

97% / 58%

NA

NA

2011

NA

NA

NA

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

Scale: Edgewood ACT mean scores compared to state

Source: ACT (American College Testing)

ACT

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

EJSHS/State

 

ACT

Math

Reading

English

Science

Composite

# of Students Tested

2013

25.7 / 19.7

26.3 / 20.4

25.3 / 18.7

25.3 / 19.1

25.8 / 19.6

127

2012

25.6 / 20.0

26.7 / 20.5

25.6 / 18.9

24.8 / 19.3

25.8 / 19.8

138

2011

25.9 / 19.9

25.9 / 20.2

25.3 / 18.8

25.4 / 19.1

25.7 / 19.6

109

               

Edgewood Jr/Sr High School

Scale: % at or above proficient compared to global

Source: Advanced Placement (AP) Exam Scores

AP

EJSHS/Global

 

 

 

 

Student Pass Rate

# of EJSHS Students  Enrolled in AP Coursework

% of EJSHS Students Enrolled in AP Coursework

# of AP Exams Administered to Students

Year 2013

64% / 55%

408

45%

785

Year 2012

61% / 59%

436

47%

801

Year 2011

75% / 59%

249

27%

507

Year 2010

71% / 61%

232

25%

400

Year 2009

70% / 60%

273

30%

Not Available

Year 2008

58% / 60%

180

20%

Not Available

 

  • Awarded an A+ School designation from the Florida Department of Education for the last 10 years
  • According to US News and World Report, the top-scoring Brevard County school for 2016 is Edgewood Jr./Sr. High School in Merritt Island, Florida which ranked 30th nationally, 4th in the State of Florida, and the top high school in Central Florida.
  •  Edgewood was awarded Florida Arts Model School status for 2016-2019 in the area of Music. 
  • Edgewood is also recognized as a Florida Power Library School in 2015
  •   In February 2014, Edgewood was recognized as a National Model PLC School.
  • In 2013, the Washington Post ranked Edgewood as the 58th most challenging high school in the nation. 
  • Designated a National Blue Ribbon School in 2008
  • Designated a National Senior Project Certified School in 2009
  • Ranked 27th in the nation by Newsweek in 2013
  • Ranked 43rd in the nation and 6th in the state by the US News and World Report in 2012
  • Ranked as 1 of the top 3 high schools in the nation for math and science by the US News and World Report in 2012
  • Heritage Music Festival Gold Award winner in Washington DC in 2011
  • Melbourne Art Festival Best of Show winner in 2009 and 2011
  • FSEC: Energy Whiz Olympics 2013: B.A.T. Mobile Race and Design 1st place award; Energy Innovations Middle and High School 1st place design award; High School Hydrogen Challenge 1st place award winner; Bright House Solar Energy Cook-Off 1st place Solar Chef and Design award
  • 97% of students in the class of 2013 received a college scholarship
  • The class of 2013 earned $4,000,000.00 in scholarship money
  • A class of 2013 senior took 1st place in the state of Florida and was in the first 12th in the country on business issues through FBLA
  • 2013 Edgewood Robotics Team received a $10,000.00 sponsorship from Jacobs Technology of Melbourne
  • Received a grant from IAP to increase/replenish technology in the school
  • Received a grant from IAP to incorporate more teacher training
  • Received a grant from IAP to pay for every student on campus to have a student agenda book

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