Health Sciences High & Middle College

  1. PLC Story
  2. PLC Practices
  3. Achievement Data
  4. Awards
  5. Resources

HSHMC opened in 2007 as a school dedicated to providing a diploma that counted.  We wanted our graduates to be prepared for life beyond high school. As such, we created internship opportunities and modified the school schedule to allow students to spend one day per week in a hospital setting.  In doing so, we were able to provide significant amounts of time for teachers to collaborate.  In 2007, with 180 students, we operated as one group.  We meet weekly to identify units of study and assessments that would allow us to identify what students knew and what they still needed to know.  We also reviewed student performance and designed an intervention effort that did not result in students missing class time.  

Over the years, we have grown considerably and have grade level collaborative planning teams that meet weekly, for the entire day, to align their collective efforts.  These teams examine their learning intentions, seek opportunities to integrate the curriuculm across traditional discipines, and develop assessments to monitor students' understanding.

At this point, our assessment system has developed into course competencies. These competencies are the result of the work that collaborative planning teams have done, and continue to do, to identify ways for students to demonstrate their understanding.  The competencies serve as common formative assessments and include a range of projects, performances, essays, and tests.

In addition, we have refined our intervention efforts, now called Academic Recovery, fully implementing an RTI effort in the high school.  Any student who does not demonstrate competency is reviewed by the grade-level collaborative planning team and the student is engaged in a range of learning opportunities to recover, demonstrating his or her knowledge and subsequently earning the grade. 

1. Monitoring student learning on a timely basis.

Each course has a set of competencies, developed by collaborative planning teams, that allow teachers to determine when specific standards have been met.  When students do not demonstrate mastery on the standards, teams meet to discuss how to respond.  In addition, when students meet the expectations, teacher teams meet to review progress, lessons, and experiences that they want to build on in the future.  Given that teachers meet weekly, there is a regular system for monitoring student learning.  In addition, every Monday, all teachers are sent a list of students who did not demonstrate mastery via a competency and the list includes information regarding the number of weeks the student has been on the monitoring list.

When students fail to meet the expectations, measured by a competency, they are provided additional instruction and intervention.  This occurs as part of the lunch period, for an hour after school, and during the school day.  HSHMC employs two full-time staff members who provide academic recovery for students who have yet to demonstrate mastery.  These staff members are in addition to the teachers who support students' learning.  One of these staff members also functions as the athletic director, making a strong connection between athletics and the instructional program.  The other also supports students who have to miss school for health and family reasons, ensuring their continued success in academic programs.

2. Creating systems of intervention to provide students with additional time and support for learning.

In addition, as noted above, lack of performance on a given competency triggers collaborative planning team discussions focused on the needs of individual students.  The decisions these teams make result in additional supports and services being provided for students.  This can include a wide range of actions, from additional in-class individual or small group instruction to lunchtime tutoring (lunch is longer than normal at our school) to after school academic recovery sesssion.  We also employ 35 peer tutors, high school students who have been trained to assist peers.  Further, on each internship day (which occurs weekly) students have a 90 minute period of time (either first thing in the moring before the bus leaves for the hospital for half of the students or the last part of the day when the bus returns with half of the students) that can be used to focus on academic recovery.  Students who do not need academic recovery during this time engage in SAT Prep via Kahn Academy or Naviance, work on honors projects, or engage in genious hour (an opportunity to study something of personal interest).

3. Building teacher capacity to work as members of high performing collaborative teams that focus efforts on improved learning for all students.

In addition to the weekly collaborative planning time provided to all teachers, we begin each year with an off-campus two-day retreat focused on a data review, establishing SMART goals, and identifying areas of collective growth opportunities.  We have engaged the services of individuals such as Disney University (how to provide a "good show") and Jennifer Abrams (having hard conversations).  

Every three weeks, students leave early and teams meet for their collaborative professional learning. Teachers work in inquiry groups of their choice to learn. This past year, groups including learning intentions, welcoming classrooms, assessment alignment, restorative circles, and collaborative learning in a digital environment.

Regardless of the topic, teams of teachers focus on improving student learning, which is always aimed at our SMART goals developed and agreed upon based on the review of data at the retreat.  These goals are reviewed monthly, with progress monitoring and celebrations of success.

In terms of English learners, we consistently out-perform the district and match the state level performance:

CELDT Criterion (Reported by Percentage)

 

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

HSHMC

44

49

44

SDUSD

34

33

35

CA

43

34

44

 

In California, students are required to take (and pass) the high school exit exam.  HSHMC students do very well, out-performing both the district and state.  This assessment is used to detemine Adequate Yearly Progress, which HSHMC has met for each of these years.

The state pass rates are as follows:

2014 Math - 85% overall (males 84%; female 86%; Latin0 80%; Afrian American 72%; students living in poverty 80%)

2014 ELA - 83% (males 80%; female 87%; Latino 78%; Afrian American 73%; students living in poverty 77%)

2013  Math - 84% (males 83%; female 85%; Latino 79%; Afrian American 71%; students living in poverty 78%)

2013 ELA - 83% (males 80%; female 87%; Latino 78%; Afrian American 73%; students living in poverty 77%)

2012 Math - 84% (males 83%; female 85%; Latino 78%; Afrian American 69%; students living in poverty 78%)

2012 ELA - 83%  (males 79%; female 87%; Latino 77%; Afrian American 73%; students living in poverty 76%)

As noted in the table below, students at HSHMC (which is more diverse than the aggregate state data) score higher.  In addition, HSHMC has focused on students most at risk maintaining pass rates in the 90%+ for subgroups.  

Disaggregated CAHSEE 10th Grade Scores for English Language Arts

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Overall

92%

91%

90%

93%

97%

96%

97%

Percentage Passing by Gender

Male

85%

89%

82%

90%

94%

100%

95%

Female

94%

95%

93%

95%

98%

95%

99%

Percentage Passing by Race/Ethnicity

African American

n/a

94%

78%

97%

96%

100%

100%

Hispanic/Latino

91%

86%

80%

91%

95%

94%

95%

White

86%

98%

82%

100%

100%

100%

100%

Percentage Passing by Language Fluency

EL

n/a

67%

58%

70%

84%

96%

88%

Redesignated FEP

n/a

94%

95%

97%

98%

98%

100%

Percentage Passing for Economic Status

Free/Reduced Lunch

89%

82%

85%

93%

96%

94%

97%

 

Disaggregated CAHSEE 10th Grade Scores for Mathematics

 

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Overall

89%

88%

92%

93%

94%

96%

96%

Percentage Passing by Gender

Male

85%

93%

88%

95%

92%

100%

98%

Female

94%

85%

74%

92%

96%

95%

95%

Percentage Passing by Race/Ethnicity

African American

n/a

69%

66%

90%

89%

100%

96%

Hispanic/Latino

91%

88%

79%

93%

95%

94%

95%

White

100%

98%

81%

89%

92%

100%

100%

Percentage Passing by Language Fluency

EL

n/a

71%

55%

91%

84%

92%

100%

Redesignated FEP

n/a

100%

95%

97%

98%

95%

93%

Percentage Passing for Economic Status

Free/Reduced Lunch

78%

80%

91%

91%

95%

95%

100%

 California also ranks schools using the Academic Performance Index, which is a combined measure of all tested subjects (English, mathematics, science, social studies, high school exit exam, and graduate rates. HSHMC's API for the past three years continues to show growth:

2010-11: 752

2011-12: 797

2012-13: 828

2013-14: Wavied for entire state per federal guidelines 

Ann additional tool we use is a reading assessment based on the Lexile leveling system.  Our data shows annual growth for students.  

Lexile Reading Levels (as a comparison, MetaMetrics reports that high school students advance an average of 25 points per year.)

 

 

9

10

11

2012-13 Pre-test

815L

969L

1061L

2012-13 Post-test

944L

1142L

1175L

 

 

 

 

2013-14 Pre-test

928L

950L

1052L

2013-14 Post-test

998L

1027L

1160L

 

 

 

 

2014-15 Pre-test

764L

850L

920L

2014-15 Post-test

 

 

 

873L

990L

1041L

2015 - California Gold Ribbon, California Department of Education

2014 - US News & World Report, Best High Schools

2013 - California Distinguish School, California Department of Education

 
2013 - Title 1 Academic Achievement Award (doubling the achievement of student living in poverty for two consecutive years), California Department of Education

2013 - School Safety Award, School Safety Advocacy Council 

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