R.L. Stevenson Elementary

  1. PLC Story
  2. PLC Practices
  3. Achievement Data
  4. Awards
  5. Resources

Stevenson has been engaging in the PLC process for a number of years. Decisions are made by consensus and is a long process, but the buy-in comes by working through it.  Stevenson has been addressing the big idea of "rigor" due to the onset of the new Florida Standards, the goal remains the same, to educate students so they are college and career ready.  With this goal, are new calls for increasing rigor in our classrooms with a commitment to current research of curriculum and instructional practices through planning.  One might say that we are working to redefine it by analyzing how we work to better teach our students.  Our agenda is to understand the depth of the standards by adding quality student engagement tasks aligned to them.  Our levels of PLC implementation have become a refocused mission with action.  Along with our routinely scheduled grade level collaborative teams, vertical collaborative teams (known as “Houses"), and data collaborative teams, Stevenson has also implemented a Parent Liaison team where they study curriculum research in the areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) for example, creativity, and growth mindset, and fundraising for STEM.  The Parent Liaison team has agreed to share this information with the appropriate stakeholders in our school community as well as provide resources to potential partners.  The purpose of our Guidance Leadership collaborative team is to examine and improve current processes utilized to identify students who are struggling learners. We continue to utilize adhoc committees formed to discuss pertinent topics such as priority standards and the creation of backward design modules through the framework of the Literacy Design Collaborative. Students participate in a similar process through "Town House Meetings" where they work in a vertical way (grades K-2 and 3-6) by learning together and doing together in their own “Town House.” These town house meetings build on creating a school community through collaborative investigation that becomes a part of their learning processes.  At our most recent teacher's “House Meetings” a mammoth study is underway to learn about performance scales. Performance scales involves the process of informing students to give them a picture of their progress related to standards and how they might improve their work to master the standards. Our ad hoc summer collaborative team was charged to prioritize the standards.  This lengthy process moved us toward the creation of scale implementation in mathematics.  Stevenson learns from understanding by doing which leads to quality work and ownership.  As we create and implement performance scales the power of our collaborative work is in the collective inquiry and consensus through reflection, as well as the development of every scale that diagnoses a student’s performance along the way that leads to mastery of the standard.   By doing so, better understanding of the curriculum and “what and how I teach” becomes the teacher's self-discovery.   These examples hallmark our collaborative work.  Another collaborative team is the involvement of teachers and administrators meeting to conduct instructional rounds.  Instructional rounds have been implemented to enhance teachers' pedagogical skills, to observe high level student engagement and at the same time develop collaboration with respect of the work done outside one's own grade level by seeing how the curriculum develops from grade-to-grade. With focus areas identified as seen on our performance appraisal tool, observing teachers record what they see during the 25 minutes that a round typically lasts, focuses teachers on observable practices.  After each instructional round, members of the observing team convene to reflect on their experiences. Our collaborative team extends beyond our school walls with other elementary schools.  Working as a "mega collaborative team" has been beneficial to our teachers as well as school leaders. For example, sharing priority standards with Pinewood Elementary in mathematics and ELA has allowed for a comparative study to see similarities and approaches.  At West Melbourne School of Science, the collaborative team process has focused our collective creation of Literacy Design Collaborative modules of study through the use of backward design planning.  To compare student results and student generated products has helped to analyze the interpretation of our instructional ladder and see the impact made on student performance from school-to-school.  All of our collaborative team efforts continue to stay true to our schools’ mission and vision to improve pedagogical knowledge and practice to give our students an opportunity to live and lead a quality and rewarding life.  It also coincides with our district’s model of continuous improvement. 

1. Monitoring student learning on a timely basis.

Student progress is monitored on a regular basis through the use of standards based formative and summative assessments created by our district or grade level collaborative teams.

Common formative assessments include:

Kindergarten: The team creates weekly assessments to monitor letter names and sounds, sight words, and phonological awareness. Anecdotal notes are also taken daily.  Running records are administered when students read to a sight word benchmark.  District assessment are administered quarterly.  Math assessment is performance based (weekly and quarterly for the district) as teachers monitor understanding.  A problem is posed and students complete the problem as teachers observe.  Kindergarten teachers also “catch and release” students during the “You Do,” portion of instruction.  Students are pulled for additional instruction or clarification.

1st Grade: The  team creates standards-based comprehension assessments.  For rigor, articles are located to teach close reading and higher order questions are generated from those texts. Short responses are included in this assessment.   A district reading assessment is given twice a year. Math quick checks are administered prior to the “topic” assessment. “Topic” assessments are given every 1 or 2 weeks.

2nd Grade:  With the emphasis on close reading and complex text the collaborative team creates comprehension assessments.  A “cold” read selection or running record is also administered to determine oral reading fluency and comprehension.  Math “quick checks” are administered prior to the “topic” assessment given every 1 or 2 weeks.  A district reading assessment is given two to three times a year.

Grades 3-6: Students are assessed weekly using rigorous standards based texts. Grade 3 utilizes this tool as a formative assessment.  Grades 4-6 utilize a “cold” read as a measure of fluency and comprehension weekly or biweekly. 

All students participate in the monthly school-wide “mock writes” for assessment of writing, created by grade level collaborative teams.  Formative assessments are administered throughout the instructional ladder of Literacy Design Collaborative modules.  It concludes with a written assessment that utilizes a close read with complex text. Formative assessment techniques such as exit slips, and “in process” checks for understanding, such as “thumbs up, thumbs down,” white boards, and teacher observation of student work are also utilized.

As a result of our collaborative team study with performance scales, grade levels have created learning progressions that help them to understand(formative assessment), and adjust instruction based on a student’s level on that scale.   Combined with weekly progress monitoring of students, by making comparisons from teacher-to-teacher and student-to-student, patterns are identified and then addressed as appropriate. This is an on-going process that takes place at many levels, i.e., grade level team meetings, vertical team meetings, faculty meetings, and Individual Problem Solving Team (IPST) meetings, and "Kid Talk" meetings.  "Kid Talk," meetings include the school psychologist, staffing specialist, guidance counselor and teacher(s) and focus on determining the best intervention for the struggling learner.  This is a precursor to the more formal IPST meeting.  Students who are receiving intervention services are monitored on a weekly or bi-weekly basis depending on the specific intervention. These are critical data components for our collaborative teams.

 

2. Creating systems of intervention to provide students with additional time and support for learning.

On a near weekly basis, each grade level holds meetings in the presence of the school’s administration and the school counselor, to review data regarding student performance from tests and other formative assessments that will help to guide and redirect instruction based on students’ needs. Response to Intervention (RtI) are then developed to specifically address individual student needs rather than to direct instruction holistically. Different tiers of support aid students depending on the results specified by the intervention(s). Knowing that differentiated instruction is our first line of defense we analyze our instruction at the core level.  Is our instruction meeting the needs of our learners?  Is the curriculum attainable by the student?  Is the class environment conducive to learning? Once these questions are analyzed and answered, an increase in intervention is implemented when necessary which is determined first by our "Kid Talk" team and then by the Individual Problem Solving Team (IPST), comprised of school psychologists, staffing specialist, behavior analysts, resource teachers and sometimes social workers. IPST meetings also occur on a weekly basis to discuss students of concern.

Students are sometimes grouped by ability and at other times are heterogeneously grouped but with others students. This kind of altering in the schedule can only work when teachers trust each other enough to be able to share their students with another teacher and to feel comfortable being observed by teachers. Teachers frequently come together to openly discuss students with administrative input in order to devise a plan that will support and assist the student who is struggling academically and or behaviorally. We “walk to intervention” making students feel comfortable and relaxed in a supportive environment. Parents are willingly looking for this kind of help by knowing their student is being served based on need. Our teachers are committed to the success of our students and will also provide before school, after school, and lunch time assistance for students.  Our after school care also plays a part in student achievement.  Often you will find teachers communicating with the after school facilitator letting them know of academic concerns and how they can help.  Stevenson has an attitude of collective responsibility when it comes to the academic success of our students.

3. Building teacher capacity to work as members of high performing collaborative teams that focus efforts on improved learning for all students.

 

The culture of the Stevenson school community is one of collaboration and continuous improvement. We indicate this importance through the creation of the master schedule.  There are days that teachers have 2 planning periods (our students are in dance) therefore we have not broken contractual policy and teacher can meet in their collaborative teams.

 

Stevenson’s collaborative teams have become a well-oiled machine where the structure remains the same (grade level meetings, “House” meetings, data team meetings, etc. ), yet the content(for 2014-2015 scales, priority standards, writing) differs based on the School Improvement Plan focused on areas (based on data) that need to be addressed.  Grade level meetings and “House” (vertical collaborative team) meetings occur weekly.  We trade out a grade level meeting once a month for teacher data collaborative teams.  The IPST team meets every week.  “Kid Talk,” occurs when needed.  Resource and support teachers participate, as well as our literacy coach.

 

 Teachers collect data at the beginning of the school year to know their students and determine instructional goals (both long term and short terms).  Repeatedly teachers come back to their collaborative teams and collectively analyze the work of their students.  Differentiated instruction and intervention are discussed and are avenues to meet student needs.  Data is then collected to determine if instruction is working. This is ongoing and repeated to best serve our students.  We are always committed to providing this collaborative time for teachers, however, we also find that they are meeting on their own time.  This is to discuss the nuts and bolts of their schedules or continue the process/product we started in grade level or “House” meetings.

 

Little, if anything, is done in isolation at Stevenson.  When collaborating, the focus may be on instruction, our School Improvement Plan (SIP) focus or the data we derive from assessments formative and summative in nature.  Discussion is at a level that empowers and extends everyone’s learning in pedagogy, content, and collaboration.  The end goal is always what is best for our students.  Because there is little isolation, you will find experienced teachers mentoring new teachers in an informal manner and in a formal manner during our mentor and mentee meetings held monthly as well as modeling and observation.  Adhoc collaborative teams (interest based or one representative from each grade level) fill quickly and are happy to take on a new endeavor, often with teacher leaders at the helm.

 

 Stevenson teachers participate in book studies to add to their knowledge of our SIP focus as well as participate in Instructional Rounds where teachers learn from other teachers through observation and reflective feedback. Instructional Rounds occur once a quarter.

At Stevenson teachers are also encouraged to share their strengths (e.g. writing) by heading adhoc committees or assisting with district professional development days.  Content of PDD is determined by possible district initiatives, but more importantly, current areas of focus in our school improvement plan. Several teachers this year facilitated collaborative teams on creating literacy design collaborative modules and priority standards.

 

Stevenson’s administration promotes the success of all students by advocating, nurturing, and sustaining a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning and staff professional growth. It is the way we do business.

 

 

 

 

         

2013, 2014 FCAT       RESULTS

 

2013

State Rank

2014

State Rank

RLS 3rd Grade Reading

223

7th

223

6th

 

 

 

   

RLS 4th Grade Reading

235

4th

234

6th

 

 

 

   

RLS 5th Grade Reading

237

8th

242

5th

 

 

 

   

RLS 6th Grade Reading

249

4th

251

4th

 

 

 

   

RLS 3rd Grade Math

121

3rd

221

8th

 

 

 

   

RLS 4th Grade Math

239

3rd

241

4th

 

 

 

   

RLS 5th Grade Math

237

10th

238

13

 

 

 

   

RLS 6th Grade Math

252

4th

254

6th

 

 

 

   

RLS 4th Grade Writing

4.2

3rd

4.2

3rd

 

 

 

   

RLS 5th Grade Science

219

13th

224

8th

 

 

 

   

 

 

School Accountability Report
 
School Number School School Year Grade % at Level 3 or Higher in Reading % at Level 3 or Higher in Math % Meeting the Writing Standard % at Level 3 or Higher in Science % Making Learning Gains in Reading % Making Learning Gains in Math % of Lowest 25% Making Learning Gains in Reading % of Lowest 25% Making Learning Gains in Math Points Earned Percent Tested Free and Reduced Lunch Minority Rate
  (Includes Learning Gains)
   
Brevard  
4071   ROBERT L. STEVENSON ELEMENTARY   2013-14 A   97  97   94   94   84   88   100   84   738   100   15   29  
4071   Brevard County, Florida 2012-13 A   95  93   93   88   78   80   78   80   685   100   15   28  
4071     2011-12 A   96  95   99   93   79   84   79   84   709   100   13   27  
4071     2010-11 A   98  99   100   96   76   73   76   73   691   99   12   27  

 

State/School Percentage Passing (Level 3 and Above)

3rd Grade

 

 

State

Reading

School

Reading

State

Math

School

Math

2011

57

97

56

96

2012

56

94

58

96

2013

57

97

58

87

2014

57

96

58

100

 

 

4th  Grade

 

 

State

Reading

School

Reading

State

Math

School

Math

State Writing

School Writing

2011

59

92

58

97

NA

NA

2012

62

97

60

93

48

92

2013

60

95

61

96

57

93

2014

61

97

63

99

53

93

 

 

5th  Grade

 

 

State

Reading

School Reading

State

Math

School

Math

State

Science

School

Science

2011

58

96

56

96

NA

NA

2012

61

97

57

92

52

94

2013

60

90

55

91

53

88

2014

61

96

56

92

54

94

 

 

6th  Grade

 

 

State

Reading

School Reading

State

Math

School

Math

2011

58

98

53

96

2012

57

95

53

97

2013

59

98

52

98

2014

60

99

53

96

 

 District/School Percentage Passing

3rd Grade

 

 

District

Reading

School

Reading

District

Math

School

Math

2010-2011

79

97

82

96

2011-2012

65

94

63

96

2012-2013

64

97

57

87

2013-2014

64

96

58

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

4th Grade

 

 

District

Reading

School

Reading

District

Math

School

Math

2010-2011

77

97

80

96

2011-2012

70

94

76

96

2012-2013

67

97

63

87

2013-2014

65

96

62

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

5th Grade

 

 

District

Reading

School

Reading

District

Math

School

Math

2010-2011

76

97

69

96

2011-2012

66

94

61

96

2012-2013

66

97

58

87

2013-2014

66

96

60

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

6th Grade

 

 

District

Reading

School

Reading

District

Math

School

Math

2010-2011

81

97

78

96

2011-2012

72

94

    72

96

2012-2013

72

97

68

87

2013-2014

 

 

We recently received Simulated School Grades from the Accountability, Research, and Measurement Department of the FL DOE.  In light of the administration of the new state assessment FSA we were provided with this data:

 

RLS Stevenson FSA Simulation Scores

English Language Arts Acheivement

94

Mathematics Acheivement

97

Science Acheivement

87

Total Points Earned

278

Total Components

3

Percentage of Total Possible Points

93%

Percent Tested

99%

Simulated Grade

A

Minority Rate

27

Free-Reduced Lunch

16

 

 

 

 

 

 

73

96

72

100

 

 

 

Florida State Assessments

Data From the State of Florida

State Rank

RLS 3rd Grade Reading

4th

 

 

RLS 4th Grade Reading

4th

 

 

RLS 5th Grade Reading

5th

 

 

RLS 6th Grade Reading

4th

 

 

RLS 3rd Grade Math

4th

 

 

RLS 4th Grade Math

2nd

 

 

RLS 5th Grade Math

7th

 

 

RLS 6th Grade Math

4th

 

 

RLS 4th Grade Writing

Included in the ELA Score. 

 

 

RLS 5th Grade Science

8th

 

 

 

 

Robotics Team Award-Brevard County Core Values Award

Brevard Public Schools Bright Ideas Mini-Grant (3D Printer)

TERRA-Technology Education Research and Redesign Allicane Grant (3D Printer, 3D pen)

Brevard County Schools Digital Classroom Plan-1 out of 13 schools selected upon application submitted. (Estimated at $100, 000 for infrastructure, 280 laptops, professional development)

Brevard Public Schools Bright Ideas Mini-Grant (Music Software, instruments, music compostion books)

Exemplary Math Teacher of the Year for Brevard Public Schools, Kim Ferris

Principal and Teacher leaders trained teachers from BPS school on Scales.

Stevenson presented on LDC at the recent NLP Symposium (Nov. 3rd, 2015) and at the SREB Regional conference in Atlanta (July 2015).

Stevenson was ranked 3RD in the state on standardized testing for having make highest learning gains in 2014.

Stevenson presented to principals at the summer Common Core Institute for Principals in 2013.

Stevenson presented at the FLDOE State Conference on Common Core to 5000 educators in 2012.

Stevenson is a National Blue Ribbon Presidential School of Excellence.

Ranked as one of the nation’s top 100 elementary schools.

Stevenson is a Florida State Music Demonstration School.

Stevenson is a Florida State Art Demonstration School (EVA).

Stevenson has been an “Arts Achieve Model School of Excellence.”

Stevenson is an ATTAIN Applied Technology Demonstration School.

Stevenson is an All School Professional Learning Community National Model

Stevenson is a 5 Star School for High Level Parent and community Volunteerism.

Stevenson’s Principal was named Arts Administrator of the Year, 2009.

Stevenson’s principal was recognized as Teacher of the Year in 1993.

Stevenson’s Principal received an honorarium from Westside Elementary School, 2000.

Stevenson currently has 4 National Board Certified Teachers on Staff.

Stevenson won 13 Science Awards last year and three top awards (with stipends) for Best of Show in Biological, Physical, and Team Projects.

Stevenson’s Leadership Team(comprised of Principal, Assistant Principal, and Teacher Leaders) was asked to present to 5000 educators at the State’s Summer Conference on New Standards in Education in 2012 to a panel comprised of Chancellors of Education and County Superintendents,

Stevenson has one of the highest daily average attendance ratings in Brevard County.

Stevenson accrues annually well over 22, 000 hours of volunteer time.

Every Stevenson students takes dance classes as part of the academic program.

 

 

 

 

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