Hollibrook Elementary School

  1. PLC Story
  2. PLC Practices
  3. Achievement Data
  4. Awards
  5. Resources

Six years ago, we began the work of improving the academic progress and social emotional development of students at Hollibrook Elementary due to the school rating of an "F" (improvement required) given by the state. We currently have 717 students enrolled where all students come from one street with six apartment complexes. Here, we cannot only teach with excellence, but with a drive to provide equity by creating experiences that will provide lifelong learning and truly change students' lives and futures. 99% of the students we serve are Hispanic; 95% are at risk; 98% are English Language Learners; and 100% of our students receive free and reduced lunch. The number of recent immigrants has been high throughout the years and has reached up to 150 students in one year and increased our mobility rate to 20%. After creating and consistently meeting with the Guiding Coalition team to review Hollibrook's needs assessment document, we identified multiple opportunities to improve our culture of learning. We were intentional and included the four pillars of PLC so one of the main focuses at Hollibrook was to create a sustainable mission and vision to transform staff culture by connecting everything we do back to our mission and vision. We wanted to ensure that all staff not only see the mission posted on a poster, but have our mission become what we stood for as a campus. Every morning all staff and students recite it during morning announcements and can often hear key words being quoted by staff and students in the hallways. “Mission: Hollibrook Hornets work hard to create a safe and positive environment to achieve excellence in teaching and learning for ALL, through collaboration.” The focus on our mission has encouraged staff and students to model true collaboration in teaching and learning that have led to our student academic gains. We also knew that in aligning to the four pillars, we needed to bring our campus goals front and center. Staff and students knew and understood what our goals were.

Our Goals:

  • Provide Equity in education for all staff and students
  • Empower students to become life-long learners and begin a path to a university
  • Academically prepared with strong literacy, numeracy, and reasoning skills
  • Ethical & service-minded students that act with integrity & grit
  • Empathetic & Self-Aware students and teachers that believe and invest in themselves and foster self-control
  • Persistent & adaptable in order to maximize all gifts and talents while learning and growing from mistakes
  • Resourceful problem-solvers that are solutions-minded
  • Communicator & collaborator who works interdependently, actively participates, collaborates, and communicates ideas.

 We developed procedures that systematically reviewed supports for student academic progress, data analysis, data trackers, and teacher needs. We also identified specific gaps in student achievement that quickly led us to develop goals for second language acquisition, teacher efficacy, school culture, the RTI process, and data analysis. After attending the professional learning communities conference, the Hollibrook Elementary Guiding Coalition was committed to fostering the PLC at work process and spreading the seeds to the remainder of the staff. 

We set goals at the beginning of each school year that align with the key factors of PLC that are led by the teachers in the Guiding Coalition. They trained all staff at our Back-to-School professional development session about the Four Pillars of PLC, Three Big Ideas, Four Critical Questions, and Six Key Characteristics of Professional Learning Communities. Their presentation began with a focus on several years of data as evidence to present the “WHY” which encompassed our purpose and led staff to the campus mission. Collective responsibility quickly hovered in hallways as students, teachers, interventionists, leaders, and support staff joined in on this journey. The PLC at work process brought a shared understanding that provoked the on-going process of team collaboration to improve our culture of learning to support our goals and mission.

All grade level teams met and identified group meeting norms that would keep the focus on the process toward improving student achievement. Grade level teams were given extra planning time during school hours to have uninterrupted sessions to collaborate about goals, tracking academic progress, conducting data digs, attending professional development learning, and developing strategies that increased essential learning success that focuses on the whole child. The Guiding Coalition team collaboratively created a schedule and provided coverage that allowed grade level teams to meet for 1½ hours on a 6-day rotation to support the PLC at work process. The schedule allowed time for staff and administrators to assess efficacy and collaborate on intentional steps to accelerate progress toward goals. Professional development areas were identified and were provided based on the needs of our students and staff. Teachers chose from receiving professional development learning to improve lesson delivery, strengthen their higher-level essential questioning skills, increasing rigor in presentations and/or developing data-driven independent student assignments. 

Critical items continue to be at the head of our PLC focus as we work to maintain a path to sustainability at Hollibrook Elementary. All staff members are committed to becoming agents of change in providing an equitable learning experience for all students. Data demonstrated a steady increase in student achievement, and we proudly moved from an “F” rating to a “B” rating in 2019 by TEA qualifications. Focused items that have contributed to this great progress include- professional development on ESL strategies to support language transfer, additional uninterrupted grade level planning sessions which targeted student data while using debrief forms to reassess and set goals, reviewing of status of the class system by grade level for monitoring student performance and support for RTI identification, the utilization of campus-based assessments based on state priority standards, and intentional ongoing professional development and coaching support provided on campus. Teacher efficacy has also been supported through ongoing classroom observations by campus instructional coaches, district literacy instructional support coaches, and administrators with specific feedback that contained a plan of action with accountability measures to monitor progress. 

A big part of our PLC community has also been our core values which is one of the four pillars of PLC. Spring Branch ISD has core values that Hollibrook adopted as our campus core values as well.  During planning and making decisions we looked to our core values which shifted teacher practices and mindsets that affected outcomes positively. This culture helped to increase teacher capacity and student achievement overall.

Our Core Values include:

Every Child - We put students at the heart of everything we do.

Collective Greatness - We, as a community, leverage our individual strengths to reach challenging goals.

Collaborative Spirit - We believe in each other and find joy in our work.

Limitless Curiosity - We never stop learning and growing.

Moral Compass - We are guided by strong character, ethics and integrity

As we close the 2020-2021 school year and prepare for the 2021-2022, we acknowledge how professional learning communities are critical to the impact and success of our campus. The PLC at work process has transformed our school culture and mindsets of all stakeholders into true agents of change. The Guidance Coalition and staff continue to assess areas of strengths and weaknesses in order to set new rigorous but attainable goals for the new year. We look forward to continuing the PLC journey and strengthen our culture of learning in order “to achieve excellence in teaching and learning for ALL, through collaboration.”

1. Monitoring student learning on a timely basis.

Spring Branch ISD consistently implements and supports Units of Study in all elementary campuses. Our district provided 600 classroom library books for each of our teachers, kindergarten through fifth grade. Each teacher has their own grade level materials needed for planning and creating rigorous activities. In addition, they are equipped to locate other resources that support learning. Each school also received a collection of leveled readers for intervention for all grade levels. Hollibrook supported the intervention collection by adding books that supplement needs above and below grade level.

Spring Branch provides professional development support at each campus through a Literacy Instructional Support representative. LISs at Hollibrook are available for observations and feedback, modeling lessons, unpacking units and guiding teachers during planning sessions. As the school administration identifies teacher needs in each grade level, the LISs prepare trainings that can be delivered in 6-day rotations. Our schedule allows grade levels to meet for one and a half hours every six days besides 45-minute daily planning. Once teachers begin implementing new strategies in their classrooms, administrators conduct T-TESS observations that provide feedback, suggestions and new goals.   

Hollibrook utilizes multiple ways to measure student academic progress throughout the year focusing on priority standards at each grade level. We monitor campus-based assessments, running records, district assessments, released STAAR, and MAP growth through data trackers. Teachers and administrators analyze data after every assessment to adjust ways in which we support student growth across all grade levels. 

Students monitor their personal academic growth by meeting with teachers, completing a data chart, and setting goals before and after assessments. Teachers meet with administrators for a more in-depth analysis of classroom data and develop a plan that includes growth for every student. Administrators create a data wall that allows a close monitoring of each content by teachers and student.

During the summer the coalition team analyzed the end of the year data and selected the first group of students who will receive the highest level of intervention as soon as the school year begins. These students will receive instruction at three levels that include: whole group instruction (Tier 1), Small group instruction (Teacher/Tier 2), and Intervention Pull out (Tier 3). Interventionists who service students at Tier 3 pull out students two to three times per week for 30 minutes each session. After-school tutorial is another layer of instruction that is provided for students that are two or more grade levels behind. Lessons for Tier 3 Intervention and after-school tutorials are planned based on data analyzed. The coalition team utilized essential TEKS, objectives, rigor, and reading levels to plan intervention lessons. Student academic progress is closely monitored by teacher and interventionists and reported during data meetings that are held every 2 weeks.

We also identified students that could be challenged with an advanced program led by the librarian. The students selected for the advanced track were students that consistently demonstrated on or above grade level performance. The librarian, in collaboration with math, reading, writing, and science teachers developed rigorous units that students could work on at their own pace and interests. Data conversations with teachers and interventionists has helped our campus ensure that we are providing instruction that meets students’ zone of proximal development thus providing educational equity.  The Campus Leadership Team created opportunities for teachers to familiarize themselves with the essential standards in their own grade level then transition into a vertical alignment with one grade level above and one grade level below. These trainings were led by their very own grade level teachers who presented to their own grade level and then presented to content teams below one grade level and to content teams above one grade level. This process helped teachers know what students should have learned in the grade level before, and helped the teachers see that what they are teaching is a building block for students in their academic progress. Teachers embraced the TEKS identified as essential skills and indicated their intentional use of essential skills in their lesson by highlighting them on their lesson plans. Assessments created spiraled these essential skills throughout the year. Monitoring progress became easier when we identified essential skills that we used to guide planning, lesson deliveries, assessments, and interventions. 

2. Creating systems of intervention to provide students with additional time and support for learning.

Hollibrook is creating and implementing systems of intervention and extension the following ways:

  • Early Intervention identification – Utilized data from the school year that ended, the Campus Leadership Team, teachers, and intervention specialists looked at the students’ academic needs in each grade level, and developed lesson plans based on essential standards they have not mastered. We created strategic intervention schedules that allowed students to be present for Tier 1 instruction in the classroom, Tier 2 instruction in small group with the teacher, and Tier 3 intervention with the interventionist specialists. We monitored student progress through exit tickets, reporting category quizzes, teacher observations, and through student performance on independent practices. Students who were identified as struggling joined an intervention group.
  • Daily TIER 3 intervention support - Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions are provided by the classroom teacher. Tier 3 interventions are provided by the content interventionists by pulling students out 3-5 times a week for 30 minutes each session after whole group instruction has been provided. Campus Leadership Teams work on adjusting the grade level schedules to each student receives whole group instruction before required Tier 3 intervention sessions. 
  • Interventionists Principal data conversations every 2 weeks - The building administration meets with each interventionist every 2 weeks to individually discuss student progress, intervention efficacy, student concerns, and common trends. Goals are reassessed and an action plan is discussed regarding concerns. Interventionists maintain their own data log starting at day 1 in preparation for data discussions.
  • Student Support Committees - Every 4-6 weeks Student Support Committees meet by grade level to discuss student progress through the interventions that are being provided by the classroom teacher, interventionists, or instructional specialists. The committee makes data-based decisions about whether to continue interventions with the same time and treatment or to move forward with a referral for testing of possible learning disabilities. Parents are asked to join, when available, in the meetings so that they are aware of the support given and plan to proceed. 
  • Status of the Class student monitoring - Teachers update the “Status of the Class” Google document on a weekly basis. Teachers utilize this document to develop lesson plans which targets essential standards, create tier 2 intervention groups, and develop assessments. This Google document houses all information about the student. It houses students’ previous achievement data, current achievement data, reading level progression with Midyear and end-of-year goals, testing accommodations that are routinely and effectively being used, special population information (SSC, 504, SPED) and any other information needed in a one-stop shop method. Instructional specialists monitor student progress and create intentional lesson plans that will meet the needs the data is reflecting. 
  • Data digs and discussions - After each major district or campus assessment, teachers collaboratively analyze their team efficacy through completing a Data Debrief Form that is then discussed at grade level meetings with assistant principals and instructional coaches.  At the meeting teachers lead the conversation about the student data and share their plan of action. Feedback is provided and students of concern are also discussed and interventions that have been implemented that could prompt teachers to move forward in an SSC meeting for testing.
  • Student trackers - A student tracker form was collaboratively created and used to monitor student assessment performance throughout the year. The tracker form indicates test name, subject, date taken, helpful strategies, goal for next assessment, bar graph, and parent signature.
  • Tutorials - Tutorials begin in the 1st semester and are provided once a week after school for 1½ hours which provides an extended day for students who were identified with learning gaps. Saturday Camps also occur 3 times throughout the school year for 4 hours which gives students additional support to achieve their learning goals.
  • Building teacher capacity- District and campus instructional specialist join administrators in providing professional development during our “Hornet Huddle” time schedule once every 6 days. We spend between 60 and 90 uninterrupted minutes providing professional development aimed to strengthen best practices for teachers. One way we determine what is needed in each group of teachers is by understanding data from common assessments. Teaches complete a form that allows a self-analysis of their performance through a unit of studies or a grading period. If there teachers are able to find a member of their team with skills they would like to learn, a time is scheduled for that member to demonstrate/model a lesson to the team during a planning session. Selected teachers also plan strong lessons that can be observed by members of their team. Observations usually take place with a purpose or objective created before the observation. Instructional specialists may join observations to continue conversations or descriptions of observations afterwards. Best practices continue to be monitored after every student common assessment, teacher self-assessments, and student data.

3. Building teacher capacity to work as members of high performing collaborative teams that focus efforts on improved learning for all students.

In building teacher capacity, professional development is at the center of our work. At Hollibrook Elementary, we strive in providing the most up to date and innovative practices that propel our students in their learning path. Our district, Spring Branch ISD, adopted Teacher’s College as the district curriculum for English Language Arts and is supplied with over 600 books for student libraries. Teachers received thorough training over the summer on how to properly implement their Units of Study. Throughout the school year, the district also provides “Think Tanks” sessions where teachers get together after school to discuss and share best practices for the current and future Units of Study. The assessment piece that is coupled with Teacher’s College is the students’ Fountas and Pinnell Reading Assessment that provides the reading levels of all students. This assessment is done individually; one on one with the teacher. Thorough training from the district and campus was provided. The campus instructional coaches and district literacy instructional coaches supported this work through creating a bank of teaching videos that can be accessed at the teachers’ desired time, modeling done by coaches, and explicit training on analyzing the Running Record in order to group students and plan small group instruction.  Due to COVID-19 and students being out half the school year, the COVID slide required an acceleration model of support to close gaps in reading levels.

This year we provided weekly coaching and support by the MCLs and assistant principals. Tier 2 Massive Practice intervention was among those trainings that supported closing student gaps in Reading Levels. Teachers were trained and practiced with colleagues during planning and after school sessions. All interventionists were thoroughly trained by the assistant principals when they joined intervention groups. The Massive Practice method has shown great progress in increasing reading levels that continues to motivate students and gain a love for reading. Our teachers are motivated with the effort and efficacy of Massive Practice and will begin Massive Practice the first week of school for students with reading gaps. 

Achievement Data Files

Additional Achievement Data

Hollibrook Elementary is 95% LEP, therefore another academic area we monitored since 2016 is TELPAS yearly progress by grade level. This indicator helps us understand the rate in which students are acquiring English as a second language as they continue their grade level academic learning each school year.

District and campus expectations are that students grow at least one proficiency level every school year. Teachers set a TELPAS goal at the beginning of each school year and monitor student development, adjust lessons, and provide intervention when gaps are evident. Teachers and administrators discuss progress at data meetings, appraisals, and status of the class reviews meetings.

Hollibrook develops and adjusts class schedules to ensure teachers address the need to develop academic language in English. District and campus trainings are delivered to teachers to provide instructional guidance and strengthen best practices throughout the year. At the campus level we provide trainings that align and integrate with the English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) that are included and heavily used in daily lessons. Each teacher targets speaking, listening, reading, and writing components that are integrated into each of the subjects taught. 

Since 2017 we have come closer to match the district’s average in this area as seen in the chart below:

TELPAS Yearly Progress by Grade at Hollibrook Elementary School from 2016 -2020

% Progress At Least One Proficiency Level

 

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Grade

HBE

SBISD

HBE

SBISD

HBE

SBISD

HBE

SBISD

HBE

SBISD

1

47

58

63

53

*

*

80

61

76

64

2

39

54

51

53

*

*

33

45

24

38

3

49

54

43

54

*

*

44

46

43

46

4

56

53

52

50

*

*

27

25

25

31

5

63

69

58

66

*

*

36

38

60

52

 

At the end of 2020- 2021, we looked at 154 students across campus that scored AH in writing to help us make predictions about the percent of students that met reclassification criteria to exit the bilingual program. After testing students with IOWA, we have 3 out of 4 first graders that reclassified and 6 out of 24 second graders who also made reclassification criteria. We are waiting on TELPAS scores for grades 3-5 in order to complete the process and LPAC students for next year. This data will help us set goals for 2021-2022 as we continue our journey towards academic excellence at Hollibrook Elementary.

None at this time 

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